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Home treatment for acute mental healthcare: who benefits most?


Mötteli, Sonja; Jäger, Matthias; Hepp, Urs; Wyder, Lea; Vetter, Stefan; Seifritz, Erich; Stulz, Niklaus (2020). Home treatment for acute mental healthcare: who benefits most? Community Mental Health Journal:Epub ahead of print.

Abstract

Home treatment (HT) has been proposed as an alternative to inpatient treatment for individuals in acute mental crises. However, there is limited evidence concerning the effectiveness of HT to date. The aim of this study was to investigate which patients benefit most from HT. The concept and utilization of two HT services in Switzerland were retrospectively compared based on routine medical data of all patients who were treated in one of the two HT services between July 2016 and December 2017. We examined which patient characteristics were related to successful replacement of hospital care by HT based on a calculated success score using binary regression analyses. The whole sample included 408 individuals with an average age of 43 years and of whom 68% were female. As a result of conceptual similarities, in both HT settings, the typical patient was middle-aged, female and having an affective disorder as the main diagnosis. Half of the treatment cases met the criteria of successful replacement of hospital care (> 50% of the total treatment episodes in HT, treatment duration < 40 days and treatment terminated by mutual agreement). The results of the regression analyses indicated that patients with a lower symptom severity at admission (lower HoNOS score) and those who were employed had more likely a successful replacement of hospital care.The findings suggest that patients with acute mental disorders who have a certain level of functioning and social support might benefit most from HT in the sense of successful replacement of hospital care.

Abstract

Home treatment (HT) has been proposed as an alternative to inpatient treatment for individuals in acute mental crises. However, there is limited evidence concerning the effectiveness of HT to date. The aim of this study was to investigate which patients benefit most from HT. The concept and utilization of two HT services in Switzerland were retrospectively compared based on routine medical data of all patients who were treated in one of the two HT services between July 2016 and December 2017. We examined which patient characteristics were related to successful replacement of hospital care by HT based on a calculated success score using binary regression analyses. The whole sample included 408 individuals with an average age of 43 years and of whom 68% were female. As a result of conceptual similarities, in both HT settings, the typical patient was middle-aged, female and having an affective disorder as the main diagnosis. Half of the treatment cases met the criteria of successful replacement of hospital care (> 50% of the total treatment episodes in HT, treatment duration < 40 days and treatment terminated by mutual agreement). The results of the regression analyses indicated that patients with a lower symptom severity at admission (lower HoNOS score) and those who were employed had more likely a successful replacement of hospital care.The findings suggest that patients with acute mental disorders who have a certain level of functioning and social support might benefit most from HT in the sense of successful replacement of hospital care.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, and Psychosomatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Social Sciences & Humanities > Health (social science)
Health Sciences > Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
Health Sciences > Psychiatry and Mental Health
Language:English
Date:11 April 2020
Deposited On:25 Jan 2021 13:54
Last Modified:26 Jan 2021 21:01
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0010-3853
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s10597-020-00618-3
PubMed ID:32279118

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