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Zone-dependent acute circulatory changes in abdominal organs and extremities after resuscitative balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA): an experimental model


Halvachizadeh, Sascha; Mica, Ladislav; Kalbas, Yannik; Lipiski, Miriam; Canic, Marko; Teuben, Michel; Cesarovic, Nikola; Rancic, Zoran; Cinelli, Paolo; Neuhaus, Valentin; Pape, Hans- Christoph; Pfeifer, Roman (2021). Zone-dependent acute circulatory changes in abdominal organs and extremities after resuscitative balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA): an experimental model. European journal of medical research, 26(1):10.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA) may be used in severely injured patients with uncontrollable bleeding. However, zone-dependent effects of REBOA are rarely described. We compared the short-term zone- and organ-specific microcirculatory changes in abdominal organs and the extremity during occlusion of the aorta in a standardized porcine model.
METHODS: Male pigs were placed under general anesthesia, for median laparotomy to expose intra-abdominal organs. REBOA placement occurred in Zone 1 (from origin left subclavian artery to celiac trunk), Zone 2 (between the coeliac trunk and most caudal renal artery) and Zone 3 (distal most caudal renal artery to aortic bifurcation). Local microcirculation of the intra-abdominal organs were measured at the stomach, colon, small intestine, liver, and kidneys. Furthermore, the right medial vastus muscle was included for assessment. Microcirculation was measured using oxygen-to-see device (arbitrary units, A.U). Invasive blood pressure measurements were recorded in the carotid and femoral artery (ipsilateral). Ischemia/Reperfusion (I/R)-time was 10 min with complete occlusion.
RESULTS: At baseline, microcirculation of intra-abdominal organs differed significantly (p < 0.001), the highest flow was in the kidneys (208.3 ± 32.9 A.U), followed by the colon (205.7 ± 36.2 A.U.). At occlusion in Zone 1, all truncal organs showed significant decreases (p < 0.001) in microcirculation, by 75% at the colon, and 44% at the stomach. Flow-rate changes at the extremities were non-significant (n.s). During occlusion in Zone 2, a significant decrease (p < 0.001) in microcirculation was observed at the colon (- 78%), small intestine (- 53%) and kidney (- 65%). The microcirculatory changes at the extremity were n.s. During occlusion in Zone 3, truncal and extremity microcirculatory changes were n.s.
CONCLUSION: All abdominal organs showed significant changes in microcirculation during REBOA. The intra-abdominal organs react differently to the same occlusion, whereas local microcirculation in extremities appeared to be unaffected by short-time REBOA, regardless of the zone of occlusion.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA) may be used in severely injured patients with uncontrollable bleeding. However, zone-dependent effects of REBOA are rarely described. We compared the short-term zone- and organ-specific microcirculatory changes in abdominal organs and the extremity during occlusion of the aorta in a standardized porcine model.
METHODS: Male pigs were placed under general anesthesia, for median laparotomy to expose intra-abdominal organs. REBOA placement occurred in Zone 1 (from origin left subclavian artery to celiac trunk), Zone 2 (between the coeliac trunk and most caudal renal artery) and Zone 3 (distal most caudal renal artery to aortic bifurcation). Local microcirculation of the intra-abdominal organs were measured at the stomach, colon, small intestine, liver, and kidneys. Furthermore, the right medial vastus muscle was included for assessment. Microcirculation was measured using oxygen-to-see device (arbitrary units, A.U). Invasive blood pressure measurements were recorded in the carotid and femoral artery (ipsilateral). Ischemia/Reperfusion (I/R)-time was 10 min with complete occlusion.
RESULTS: At baseline, microcirculation of intra-abdominal organs differed significantly (p < 0.001), the highest flow was in the kidneys (208.3 ± 32.9 A.U), followed by the colon (205.7 ± 36.2 A.U.). At occlusion in Zone 1, all truncal organs showed significant decreases (p < 0.001) in microcirculation, by 75% at the colon, and 44% at the stomach. Flow-rate changes at the extremities were non-significant (n.s). During occlusion in Zone 2, a significant decrease (p < 0.001) in microcirculation was observed at the colon (- 78%), small intestine (- 53%) and kidney (- 65%). The microcirculatory changes at the extremity were n.s. During occlusion in Zone 3, truncal and extremity microcirculatory changes were n.s.
CONCLUSION: All abdominal organs showed significant changes in microcirculation during REBOA. The intra-abdominal organs react differently to the same occlusion, whereas local microcirculation in extremities appeared to be unaffected by short-time REBOA, regardless of the zone of occlusion.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Department of Trauma Surgery
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Vascular Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:21 January 2021
Deposited On:25 Jan 2021 14:54
Last Modified:01 Feb 2021 16:28
Publisher:BioMed Central
ISSN:0949-2321
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1186/s40001-021-00485-y
PubMed ID:33478582

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