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Effect of changes in body mass index on the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus in HIV-positive individuals: results from the D: A: D study


Petoumenos, Kathy; Kuwanda, Locadiah; Ryom, Lene; Mocroft, Amanda; Reiss, Peter; De Wit, Stephane; Pradier, Christian; Bonnet, Fabrice; Phillips, Andrew; Hatleberg, Camilla I; d'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Weber, Rainer; Sabin, Caroline A; Lundgren, Jens; Law, Matthew G (2020). Effect of changes in body mass index on the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus in HIV-positive individuals: results from the D: A: D study. Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, Publish :Epub ahead of print.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Weight gain is common among people with HIV once antiretroviral treatment (ART) is commenced. We assess the effect of changes in body mass index (BMI), from different baseline BMI levels, on the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes mellitus (DM).

METHODS

D:A:D participants receiving ART were followed from their first BMI measurement to the first of either CVD or DM event, or earliest of 1/2/2016 or 6 months after last follow-up. Participants were stratified according to their baseline BMI, and changes from baseline BMI were calculated for each participant. Poisson regression models were used to assess the effects of changes on BMI on CVD or DM events.

RESULTS

There were 2,104 CVD and 1,583 DM events over 365,287 and 354,898 person years (rate: CVD 5.8/1000 (95% CI 5.5-6.0); DM 4.5/1000 (95% CI 4.2 - 4.7)). Participants were largely male (74%), baseline mean age of 40 years and median BMI of 23.0 (IQR: 21.0-25.3). Risk of CVD by change in BMI from baseline, stratified by baseline BMI strata showed little evidence of an increased risk of CVD with an increased BMI in any baseline BMI strata. An increase in BMI was associated with an increased risk of DM across all baseline BMI strata.

CONCLUSIONS

While increases in BMI across all levels of baseline BMI were not associated with an increased risk of CVD, such changes were consistently associated with increased risk of DM. There was also some evidence of an increased risk of CVD with a decrease in BMI.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Weight gain is common among people with HIV once antiretroviral treatment (ART) is commenced. We assess the effect of changes in body mass index (BMI), from different baseline BMI levels, on the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes mellitus (DM).

METHODS

D:A:D participants receiving ART were followed from their first BMI measurement to the first of either CVD or DM event, or earliest of 1/2/2016 or 6 months after last follow-up. Participants were stratified according to their baseline BMI, and changes from baseline BMI were calculated for each participant. Poisson regression models were used to assess the effects of changes on BMI on CVD or DM events.

RESULTS

There were 2,104 CVD and 1,583 DM events over 365,287 and 354,898 person years (rate: CVD 5.8/1000 (95% CI 5.5-6.0); DM 4.5/1000 (95% CI 4.2 - 4.7)). Participants were largely male (74%), baseline mean age of 40 years and median BMI of 23.0 (IQR: 21.0-25.3). Risk of CVD by change in BMI from baseline, stratified by baseline BMI strata showed little evidence of an increased risk of CVD with an increased BMI in any baseline BMI strata. An increase in BMI was associated with an increased risk of DM across all baseline BMI strata.

CONCLUSIONS

While increases in BMI across all levels of baseline BMI were not associated with an increased risk of CVD, such changes were consistently associated with increased risk of DM. There was also some evidence of an increased risk of CVD with a decrease in BMI.

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Additional indexing

Contributors:D:A:D Study group
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Infectious Diseases
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:17 December 2020
Deposited On:17 Feb 2021 07:21
Last Modified:20 Feb 2021 02:12
Publisher:Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:1525-4135
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/QAI.0000000000002603
PubMed ID:33351531

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