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Measuring the working experience of doctors in training


Hockey, Peter; Vaithianathan, Rhema; Bäker, Agnes; Beer, Freddy; Goodall, Amanda H; Hammerton, Matt; Jarvis, Rosalind; Brock, Susannah; Lorimer, Larissa (2020). Measuring the working experience of doctors in training. Future Healthcare Journal, 7(3):e17-22.

Abstract

Using an online tool, we report the association between tasks and ‘affect’ (underlying experience of feeling, emotion or mood) among 565 doctors in training, how positive and negative emotional intensity are associated with time of day, the extent to which positive affect is associated with breaks, and consideration about leaving the profession. Respondents spent approximately 25% of their day on paperwork or clinical work that did not involve patients, resulting in more negative emotions. Positive emotions were expressed for breaks, staff meetings, research, learning and clinical tasks that involved patients. Those having considered leaving the profession report more negative feelings. Systematic workplace changes (regular breaks, reducing paperwork and improved IT systems) could contribute to positive workday experiences and reduce intention to quit. Educators and employers have important roles in recognising, advocating for and implementing improvements at work to enhance wellbeing with potential to improve retention of doctors in training.

Abstract

Using an online tool, we report the association between tasks and ‘affect’ (underlying experience of feeling, emotion or mood) among 565 doctors in training, how positive and negative emotional intensity are associated with time of day, the extent to which positive affect is associated with breaks, and consideration about leaving the profession. Respondents spent approximately 25% of their day on paperwork or clinical work that did not involve patients, resulting in more negative emotions. Positive emotions were expressed for breaks, staff meetings, research, learning and clinical tasks that involved patients. Those having considered leaving the profession report more negative feelings. Systematic workplace changes (regular breaks, reducing paperwork and improved IT systems) could contribute to positive workday experiences and reduce intention to quit. Educators and employers have important roles in recognising, advocating for and implementing improvements at work to enhance wellbeing with potential to improve retention of doctors in training.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Business Administration
Dewey Decimal Classification:330 Economics
Language:English
Date:October 2020
Deposited On:27 Jan 2021 14:56
Last Modified:27 Jan 2021 14:57
Publisher:Royal College of Physicians
ISSN:2514-6645
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.7861/fhj.2020-0005
Other Identification Number:merlin-id:20605

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