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Cell seeding accelerates the vascularization of tissue engineering constructs in hypertensive mice


Wagner, Maximilian E H; Kampmann, Andreas; Schumann-Moor, Kathrin; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius; Tavassol, Frank; Schmeltekop, Friederike; Rücker, Martin; Lanzer, Martin; Gander, Thomas; Essig, Harald; Schumann, Paul (2021). Cell seeding accelerates the vascularization of tissue engineering constructs in hypertensive mice. Hypertension Research, 44(1):23-35.

Abstract

Rapid blood vessel ingrowth into transplanted constructs represents the key requirement for successful tissue engineering. Seeding three-dimensional scaffolds with suitable cells is an approved technique for this challenge. Since a plethora of patients suffer from widespread diseases that limit the capacity of neoangiogenesis (e.g., hypertension), we investigated the incorporation of cell-seeded poly-L-lactide-co-glycolide scaffolds in hypertensive (BPH/2J, group A) and nonhypertensive (BPN/3J, group B) mice. Collagen-coated scaffolds (A1 and B1) were additionally seeded with osteoblast-like (A2 and B2) and mesenchymal stem cells (A3 and B3). After implantation into dorsal skinfold chambers, inflammation and newly formed microvessels were measured using repetitive intravital fluorescence microscopy for 2 weeks. Apart from a weak inflammatory response in all groups, significantly increased microvascular densities were found in cell-seeded scaffolds (day 14, A2: 192 ± 12 cm/cm2, A3: 194 ± 10 cm/cm2, B2: 249 ± 19 cm/cm2, B3: 264 ± 17 cm/cm2) when compared with controls (A1: 129 ± 10 cm/cm2, B1: 185 ± 8 cm/cm2). In this context, hypertensive mice showed reduced neoangiogenesis in comparison with nonhypertensive animals. Therefore, seeding approved scaffolds with organ-specific or pluripotent cells is a very promising technique for tissue engineering in hypertensive organisms.

Abstract

Rapid blood vessel ingrowth into transplanted constructs represents the key requirement for successful tissue engineering. Seeding three-dimensional scaffolds with suitable cells is an approved technique for this challenge. Since a plethora of patients suffer from widespread diseases that limit the capacity of neoangiogenesis (e.g., hypertension), we investigated the incorporation of cell-seeded poly-L-lactide-co-glycolide scaffolds in hypertensive (BPH/2J, group A) and nonhypertensive (BPN/3J, group B) mice. Collagen-coated scaffolds (A1 and B1) were additionally seeded with osteoblast-like (A2 and B2) and mesenchymal stem cells (A3 and B3). After implantation into dorsal skinfold chambers, inflammation and newly formed microvessels were measured using repetitive intravital fluorescence microscopy for 2 weeks. Apart from a weak inflammatory response in all groups, significantly increased microvascular densities were found in cell-seeded scaffolds (day 14, A2: 192 ± 12 cm/cm2, A3: 194 ± 10 cm/cm2, B2: 249 ± 19 cm/cm2, B3: 264 ± 17 cm/cm2) when compared with controls (A1: 129 ± 10 cm/cm2, B1: 185 ± 8 cm/cm2). In this context, hypertensive mice showed reduced neoangiogenesis in comparison with nonhypertensive animals. Therefore, seeding approved scaffolds with organ-specific or pluripotent cells is a very promising technique for tissue engineering in hypertensive organisms.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Internal Medicine
Life Sciences > Physiology
Health Sciences > Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
Language:English
Date:January 2021
Deposited On:27 Jan 2021 15:26
Last Modified:28 Jan 2021 21:02
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:0916-9636
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/s41440-020-0524-z
PubMed ID:32778779

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