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The Coping with and Caring for Infants with Special Needs intervention was associated with improved motor development in preterm infants


Akhbari Ziegler, Shirin; von Rhein, Michael; Meichtry, André; Wirz, Markus; Hielkema, Tjitske; Hadders-Algra, Mijna (2020). The Coping with and Caring for Infants with Special Needs intervention was associated with improved motor development in preterm infants. Acta Paediatrica:Epub ahead of print.

Abstract

Aim: We compared the impact of standard infant physiotherapy and the family-centred programme, Coping with and Caring for Infants with Special Needs (COPCA), in infants born before 32 weeks without significant brain lesions.

Methods: This randomised controlled trial was carried out in patients' homes and outpatient settings in Switzerland between January 2016 and October 2019. We used data from the national SwissNeoNet register and an assessment battery that included infant and family outcomes and video analyses of therapy sessions. The Infant Motor Profile was the primary outcome instrument.

Results: The COPCA group comprised six boys and two girls with a median gestational age of 27 weeks (range 25-30), and the standard care group comprised seven boys and one girl with a median gestational age of 29.5 weeks (range 26-31). COPCA participants improved significantly more between baseline and 18 months in the IMP variation (9.0 percentage points, 95% confidence interval: 0.3-17.5) and performance (12.0 percentage points, 95% confidence interval: 4.1-20.6) domains than standard care participants. COPCA coaching was positively associated with IMP scores at 18 months, but some standard care actions were negatively associated.

Conclusion: COPCA was associated with better motor outcome in infants born before 32 weeks than standard infant physiotherapy.

Abstract

Aim: We compared the impact of standard infant physiotherapy and the family-centred programme, Coping with and Caring for Infants with Special Needs (COPCA), in infants born before 32 weeks without significant brain lesions.

Methods: This randomised controlled trial was carried out in patients' homes and outpatient settings in Switzerland between January 2016 and October 2019. We used data from the national SwissNeoNet register and an assessment battery that included infant and family outcomes and video analyses of therapy sessions. The Infant Motor Profile was the primary outcome instrument.

Results: The COPCA group comprised six boys and two girls with a median gestational age of 27 weeks (range 25-30), and the standard care group comprised seven boys and one girl with a median gestational age of 29.5 weeks (range 26-31). COPCA participants improved significantly more between baseline and 18 months in the IMP variation (9.0 percentage points, 95% confidence interval: 0.3-17.5) and performance (12.0 percentage points, 95% confidence interval: 4.1-20.6) domains than standard care participants. COPCA coaching was positively associated with IMP scores at 18 months, but some standard care actions were negatively associated.

Conclusion: COPCA was associated with better motor outcome in infants born before 32 weeks than standard infant physiotherapy.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Pediatrics, Perinatology and Child Health
Language:English
Date:October 2020
Deposited On:29 Jan 2021 10:12
Last Modified:30 Jan 2021 21:01
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0803-5253
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/apa.15619
PubMed ID:33047325

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