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Dysfunctional Coagulation in COVID-19: From Cell to Bedside


Wang, Jie; Saguner, Ardan M; An, Jiaqi; Ning, Yuye; Yan, Yang; Li, Guoliang (2020). Dysfunctional Coagulation in COVID-19: From Cell to Bedside. Advances in Therapy, 37(7):3033-3039.

Abstract

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which can induce multisystem disease. Human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) widely expressing in arterial and venous endothelial cells and arterial smooth muscle cells has been identified as a functional receptor for SARS-CoV-2. Dysfunction of ACE2 leads to abnormal activation of the renin-angiotensin system and a systemic endotheliitis that may relate to abnormal coagulation and sepsis. Meanwhile, innate immune response and inflammation activation participate in dysfunctional coagulation. Previous research indicated that dysfunctional coagulation was one of the important risk factors accountable for a high risk of severe disease and death in patients with COVID-19. Understanding the possible mechanisms of dysfunctional coagulation and appropriate anticoagulation therapeutic strategies are important to prevent disease deterioration and reduce fatality rates during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Abstract

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which can induce multisystem disease. Human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) widely expressing in arterial and venous endothelial cells and arterial smooth muscle cells has been identified as a functional receptor for SARS-CoV-2. Dysfunction of ACE2 leads to abnormal activation of the renin-angiotensin system and a systemic endotheliitis that may relate to abnormal coagulation and sepsis. Meanwhile, innate immune response and inflammation activation participate in dysfunctional coagulation. Previous research indicated that dysfunctional coagulation was one of the important risk factors accountable for a high risk of severe disease and death in patients with COVID-19. Understanding the possible mechanisms of dysfunctional coagulation and appropriate anticoagulation therapeutic strategies are important to prevent disease deterioration and reduce fatality rates during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Pharmacology (medical)
Language:English
Date:July 2020
Deposited On:01 Feb 2021 17:37
Last Modified:02 Feb 2021 21:01
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0741-238X
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s12325-020-01399-7
PubMed ID:32504450

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