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Pacing in serious games: exploring the effects of presentation speed on cognitive load, engagement and learning gains


Petko, Dominik; Schmid, Regina; Cantieni, Andrea (2020). Pacing in serious games: exploring the effects of presentation speed on cognitive load, engagement and learning gains. Simulation, 51(2):258-279.

Abstract

Background: To determine the optimal speed of computer-paced serious games, the interplay of cognitive load variables and game engagement variables can serve as combined criteria.
Intervention: In order to test the effects of higher or lower game speeds on different types of cognitive load and engagement, the FRESH FOOD RUNNER game was developed, which teaches the harvest seasons of different fruits and vegetables.
Method: In this study, N=58 6th grade primary school students are randomly assigned to play the serious game FRESH FOOD RUNNER at different speeds. Pre-and post-tests are used to assess learning gains, in combination with rating scales for different types of cognitive load and game engagement.
Results: Results show that highest learning gains and lowest levels of extraneous cognitive load are prevalent at medium speed settings, which are neither too fast nor too slow. A similar pattern is apparent for student ratings of game engagement.
Discussion and Conclusion: In consequence, learning gains, cognitive load and engagement variables can be regarded as suitable criteria to determine the optimal speed of serious games.

Abstract

Background: To determine the optimal speed of computer-paced serious games, the interplay of cognitive load variables and game engagement variables can serve as combined criteria.
Intervention: In order to test the effects of higher or lower game speeds on different types of cognitive load and engagement, the FRESH FOOD RUNNER game was developed, which teaches the harvest seasons of different fruits and vegetables.
Method: In this study, N=58 6th grade primary school students are randomly assigned to play the serious game FRESH FOOD RUNNER at different speeds. Pre-and post-tests are used to assess learning gains, in combination with rating scales for different types of cognitive load and game engagement.
Results: Results show that highest learning gains and lowest levels of extraneous cognitive load are prevalent at medium speed settings, which are neither too fast nor too slow. A similar pattern is apparent for student ratings of game engagement.
Discussion and Conclusion: In consequence, learning gains, cognitive load and engagement variables can be regarded as suitable criteria to determine the optimal speed of serious games.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Education
Dewey Decimal Classification:370 Education
Scopus Subject Areas:Social Sciences & Humanities > Business, Management and Accounting (miscellaneous)
Physical Sciences > Computer Science Applications
Uncontrolled Keywords:cognitive load, engagement, game-based learning, pacing, serious games
Language:English
Date:13 February 2020
Deposited On:07 Feb 2021 12:55
Last Modified:08 Feb 2021 21:00
Publisher:Sage Publications
ISSN:1046-8781
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1177/1046878120902502

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