Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Testing multiple drivers of the temperature‐size rule with nonlinear temperature increase


Tabi, Andrea; Garnier, Aurélie; Pennekamp, Frank (2020). Testing multiple drivers of the temperature‐size rule with nonlinear temperature increase. Functional Ecology, 34(12):2503-2512.

Abstract

The temperature‐size rule (TSR) describes the inverse relationship between organism size and environmental temperature in uni‐ and multicellular species. Despite the TSR being widespread, the mechanisms for shrinking body size with warming remain elusive.
Here, we experimentally test three hypotheses (differential development and growth [DDG], maintain aerobic scope and regulate oxygen supply [MASROS] and the supply–demand [SD] hypothesis) potentially explaining the TSR using the aquatic protist Colpidium striatum in three gradually changing and one constant temperature environment crossed with three different nutrient levels.
We find that the constant and slowly warming environments show similar responses in terms of population dynamics, whereas populations with linear and fast warming quickly decline and show a stronger temperature‐size response.
Our analyses suggest that acclimation may have played a role in observing these differences among treatments. The SD hypothesis is most parsimonious with the data, however, neither the DDG nor the MASROS hypothesis can be firmly dismissed. We conclude that the TSR is driven by multiple ecological and acclimatory responses, hence multicausal.

Abstract

The temperature‐size rule (TSR) describes the inverse relationship between organism size and environmental temperature in uni‐ and multicellular species. Despite the TSR being widespread, the mechanisms for shrinking body size with warming remain elusive.
Here, we experimentally test three hypotheses (differential development and growth [DDG], maintain aerobic scope and regulate oxygen supply [MASROS] and the supply–demand [SD] hypothesis) potentially explaining the TSR using the aquatic protist Colpidium striatum in three gradually changing and one constant temperature environment crossed with three different nutrient levels.
We find that the constant and slowly warming environments show similar responses in terms of population dynamics, whereas populations with linear and fast warming quickly decline and show a stronger temperature‐size response.
Our analyses suggest that acclimation may have played a role in observing these differences among treatments. The SD hypothesis is most parsimonious with the data, however, neither the DDG nor the MASROS hypothesis can be firmly dismissed. We conclude that the TSR is driven by multiple ecological and acclimatory responses, hence multicausal.

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 03 Feb 2021
1 download since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
Uncontrolled Keywords:Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
Language:English
Date:1 December 2020
Deposited On:03 Feb 2021 10:14
Last Modified:04 Feb 2021 21:00
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0269-8463
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2435.13676
Project Information:
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant ID31003A_159498
  • : Project TitlePredicting the effects of temperature on ecological systems, at population, community, and ecosystem levels of organisation

Download

Closed Access: Download allowed only for UZH members

Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only until 9 September 2022
Size: 2MB
View at publisher
Embargo till: 2022-09-09