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International ResearchKit App for women with menstrual pain: Development, Access, and Engagement


Wang, Jiani; Rogge, Alizé A; Armour, Mike; Smith, Caroline A; D’Adamo, Christopher R; Pischke, Claudia R; Yen, Hung-Rong; Wu, Mei-Yao; Moré, Ari Ojeda Ocampo; Witt, Claudia M; Pach, Daniel (2020). International ResearchKit App for women with menstrual pain: Development, Access, and Engagement. JMIR mHealth and uHealth, 8(2):e14661.

Abstract

Background: Primary dysmenorrhea is a common condition in women of reproductive age. A previous app-based study undertaken by our group demonstrated that a smartphone app supporting self-acupressure introduced by a health care professional can reduce menstrual pain.
Objective: This study aims to evaluate whether a specific smartphone app is effective in reducing menstrual pain in 18- to 34-year-old women with primary dysmenorrhea in a self-care setting. One group of women has access to the full-featured study app and will be compared with 2 control groups who have access to fewer app features. Here, we report the trial design, app development, user access, and engagement.
Methods: On the basis of the practical implications of the previous app-based study, we revised and reengineered the study app and included the ResearchKit (Apple Inc) framework. Behavior change techniques (BCTs) were implemented in the app and validated by expert ratings. User access was estimated by assessing recruitment progress over time. User evolution and baseline survey respondent rate were assessed to evaluate user engagement.
Results: The development of the study app for a 3-armed randomized controlled trial required a multidisciplinary team. The app is accessible for the target population free of charge via the Apple App Store. In Germany, within 9 months, the app was downloaded 1458 times and 328 study participants were recruited using it without external advertising. A total of 98.27% (5157/5248) of the app-based baseline questions were answered. The correct classification of BCTs used in the app required psychological expertise.
Conclusions: Conducting an innovative app study requires multidisciplinary effort. Easy access and engagement with such an app can be achieved by recruitment via the App Store. Future research is needed to investigate the determinants of user engagement, optimal BCT application, and potential clinical and self-care scenarios for app use.
Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03432611; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03432611 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/75LLAcnCQ).

Abstract

Background: Primary dysmenorrhea is a common condition in women of reproductive age. A previous app-based study undertaken by our group demonstrated that a smartphone app supporting self-acupressure introduced by a health care professional can reduce menstrual pain.
Objective: This study aims to evaluate whether a specific smartphone app is effective in reducing menstrual pain in 18- to 34-year-old women with primary dysmenorrhea in a self-care setting. One group of women has access to the full-featured study app and will be compared with 2 control groups who have access to fewer app features. Here, we report the trial design, app development, user access, and engagement.
Methods: On the basis of the practical implications of the previous app-based study, we revised and reengineered the study app and included the ResearchKit (Apple Inc) framework. Behavior change techniques (BCTs) were implemented in the app and validated by expert ratings. User access was estimated by assessing recruitment progress over time. User evolution and baseline survey respondent rate were assessed to evaluate user engagement.
Results: The development of the study app for a 3-armed randomized controlled trial required a multidisciplinary team. The app is accessible for the target population free of charge via the Apple App Store. In Germany, within 9 months, the app was downloaded 1458 times and 328 study participants were recruited using it without external advertising. A total of 98.27% (5157/5248) of the app-based baseline questions were answered. The correct classification of BCTs used in the app required psychological expertise.
Conclusions: Conducting an innovative app study requires multidisciplinary effort. Easy access and engagement with such an app can be achieved by recruitment via the App Store. Future research is needed to investigate the determinants of user engagement, optimal BCT application, and potential clinical and self-care scenarios for app use.
Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03432611; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03432611 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/75LLAcnCQ).

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Complementary Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Health Informatics
Uncontrolled Keywords:dysmenorrhea; mHealth; mobile applications; acupressure; pain; behavior change techniques (BCTs); ResearchKit; recruitment
Language:English
Date:9 February 2020
Deposited On:03 Feb 2021 18:46
Last Modified:11 Feb 2021 12:19
Publisher:JMIR Publications
ISSN:2291-5222
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.2196/14661
PubMed ID:32058976
Other Identification Number:PMCID: 7055820
Project Information:
  • : FunderClinicalTrials.gov
  • : Grant IDNCT03432611
  • : Project TitleEvaluation of a Smartphone Application for Self Care for Women With Menstrual Pain (Primary Dysmenorrhea): a Randomized Trial
  • : Project Websitehttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03432611

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