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Delirium in elderly patients: Prospective prevalence across hospital services


Fuchs, Simon; Bode, Leonie; Ernst, Jutta; Marquetand, Justus; von Känel, Roland; Böttger, Sönke (2020). Delirium in elderly patients: Prospective prevalence across hospital services. General Hospital Psychiatry, 67:19-25.

Abstract

Objectives

This study aimed to determine the 1-year prevalence of delirium and the impact of hospitalization characteristics on delirium across 34 services.
Methods

In this prospective cohort study of elderly in-patients (>65 years, N = 10,261), delirium was determined with the Delirium Observation Screening Scale (DOS) and the Intensive Care Delirium Screening Checklist (ICDSC) in a single sample over one year. We calculated univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses to understand the power of association between delirium, 34 services, sociodemographic, and admission/discharge factors.
Results

The prevalence of delirium across all included services was 32%. The odds of developing delirium was highest for intensive care units (ICU, 83.3%, OR 12.34), high for intermediate care units (IMC, 39.8%, OR 1.42) and medical services (34.2%, OR 1.19), and lower for surgical services (28.7%, OR 0.72). Compared with patients without delirium, patients with delirium were older (76.6 vs. 75 years), hospitalized twice as long (14.3 vs. 7.7 days), more commonly had pre-existent dementia (OR 11.98), and were more likely to die in-hospital (OR 24.20) and be admitted from (OR 2.75–2.97) and discharged to institutions (OR 1.66–3.97).
Conclusion

This study elaborated on the 1-year prevalence of delirium across 34 services and confirmed previous pooled findings in addition to providing new insights regarding the course of hospitalization in elderly patients.

Abstract

Objectives

This study aimed to determine the 1-year prevalence of delirium and the impact of hospitalization characteristics on delirium across 34 services.
Methods

In this prospective cohort study of elderly in-patients (>65 years, N = 10,261), delirium was determined with the Delirium Observation Screening Scale (DOS) and the Intensive Care Delirium Screening Checklist (ICDSC) in a single sample over one year. We calculated univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses to understand the power of association between delirium, 34 services, sociodemographic, and admission/discharge factors.
Results

The prevalence of delirium across all included services was 32%. The odds of developing delirium was highest for intensive care units (ICU, 83.3%, OR 12.34), high for intermediate care units (IMC, 39.8%, OR 1.42) and medical services (34.2%, OR 1.19), and lower for surgical services (28.7%, OR 0.72). Compared with patients without delirium, patients with delirium were older (76.6 vs. 75 years), hospitalized twice as long (14.3 vs. 7.7 days), more commonly had pre-existent dementia (OR 11.98), and were more likely to die in-hospital (OR 24.20) and be admitted from (OR 2.75–2.97) and discharged to institutions (OR 1.66–3.97).
Conclusion

This study elaborated on the 1-year prevalence of delirium across 34 services and confirmed previous pooled findings in addition to providing new insights regarding the course of hospitalization in elderly patients.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Klinik für Konsiliarpsychiatrie und Psychosomatik
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Psychiatry and Mental Health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Psychiatry and Mental health
Language:English
Date:25 August 2020
Deposited On:04 Feb 2021 09:30
Last Modified:05 Feb 2021 21:05
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0163-8343
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.genhosppsych.2020.08.010
PubMed ID:32911278

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