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Birth tears after spontaneous and vacuum-assisted births with different vacuum cup systems – a retrospective cohort study


Kreft, Martina; Zimmermann, Roland; Kimmich, Nina (2020). Birth tears after spontaneous and vacuum-assisted births with different vacuum cup systems – a retrospective cohort study. Journal of Perinatal Medicine, 48(6):575-581.

Abstract

Objectives Birth tears are a common complication of vaginal childbirth. We aimed to evaluate the outcomes of birth tears first by comparing the mode of vaginal birth (VB) and then comparing different vacuum cups in instrumental VBs in order to better advise childbearing women and obstetrical professionals. Methods In a retrospective cohort study, we analyzed nulliparous and multiparous women with a singleton pregnancy in vertex presentation at ≥37 + 0 gestational weeks who gave birth vaginally at our tertiary care center between 06/2012 and 12/2016. We compared the distribution of tear types in spontaneous births (SBs) vs. vacuum-assisted VBs. We then compared the tear distribution in the vacuum group when using the Kiwi Omnicup or Bird's anterior metal cup. Outcome parameters were the incidence and distribution of the different tear types dependent on the mode of delivery and type of vacuum cup. Results A total of 4549 SBs and 907 VBs were analyzed. Birth tear distribution differed significantly between the birth modes. In 15.2% of women with an SB an episiotomy was performed vs. 58.5% in women with a VB. Any kind of perineal tear was seen in 45.7% after SB and in 32.7% after VB. High-grade obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS) appeared in 1.1% after SB and in 3.1% after VB. No significant changes in tear distribution were found between the two different VB modes. Conclusions There were more episiotomies, vaginal tears and OASIS after VB than after SB. In contrast, there were more low-grade perineal and labial tears after SB. No significant differences were found between different vacuum cup systems, just a slight trend toward different tear patterns.

Abstract

Objectives Birth tears are a common complication of vaginal childbirth. We aimed to evaluate the outcomes of birth tears first by comparing the mode of vaginal birth (VB) and then comparing different vacuum cups in instrumental VBs in order to better advise childbearing women and obstetrical professionals. Methods In a retrospective cohort study, we analyzed nulliparous and multiparous women with a singleton pregnancy in vertex presentation at ≥37 + 0 gestational weeks who gave birth vaginally at our tertiary care center between 06/2012 and 12/2016. We compared the distribution of tear types in spontaneous births (SBs) vs. vacuum-assisted VBs. We then compared the tear distribution in the vacuum group when using the Kiwi Omnicup or Bird's anterior metal cup. Outcome parameters were the incidence and distribution of the different tear types dependent on the mode of delivery and type of vacuum cup. Results A total of 4549 SBs and 907 VBs were analyzed. Birth tear distribution differed significantly between the birth modes. In 15.2% of women with an SB an episiotomy was performed vs. 58.5% in women with a VB. Any kind of perineal tear was seen in 45.7% after SB and in 32.7% after VB. High-grade obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS) appeared in 1.1% after SB and in 3.1% after VB. No significant changes in tear distribution were found between the two different VB modes. Conclusions There were more episiotomies, vaginal tears and OASIS after VB than after SB. In contrast, there were more low-grade perineal and labial tears after SB. No significant differences were found between different vacuum cup systems, just a slight trend toward different tear patterns.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Obstetrics
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Pediatrics, Perinatology and Child Health
Health Sciences > Obstetrics and Gynecology
Uncontrolled Keywords:Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
Language:English
Date:28 July 2020
Deposited On:04 Feb 2021 16:00
Last Modified:05 Feb 2021 21:05
Publisher:De Gruyter
ISSN:0300-5577
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1515/jpm-2019-0477
PubMed ID:32333651

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