Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Extreme long-term outcome of operatively versus conservatively treated patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis


Farshad, Mazda; Kutschke, Lucas; Laux, Christoph J; Kabelitz, Method; Schüpbach, Regula; Böni, Thomas; Jentzsch, Thorsten (2020). Extreme long-term outcome of operatively versus conservatively treated patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. European Spine Journal, 29(8):2084-2090.

Abstract

PURPOSE

We report on outcomes of surgically versus (vs) non-surgically treated patients with moderate adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) after minimum of 29 years.

METHODS

AIS patients with a follow-up of  ≥ 41 years in the surgical group and  ≥ 29 years in the non-surgical group were included. Patients were treated surgically for primary curves  ≥ 45° vs non-surgically for curves  < 45° or refusal of surgery. Groups were matched for age, gender, comorbidities and primary curve severity. Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) was used to measure clinical outcomes and standard radiography to quantify curve severity at final follow-up.

RESULTS

In total, 16 patients (8 within each group, 75% females) with a median age of 14 (interquartile range (IQR) 2) years could be included and were followed up after 46 (IQR 12) years. All matched variables were similar for both groups, including the primary curve Cobb angles of 48° (IQR 17°) (surgical) vs 40° (IQR 19°) (non-surgical); p = 0.17). At final follow-up after a median of 47 (IQR 5) years for the surgical and 39 (IQR 19) years for the non-surgical group (p = 0.43), the ODI was similar for both groups (15 (IQR 13) points (surgical) vs 7 (IQR 15) points (non-surgical); p = 0.17) with, however, a primary curve magnitude lower in the surgical compared to the non-surgical group (38° (IQR 3°) vs 61° (IQR 33°); p = 0.01), respectively.

CONCLUSION

After around 47 and 39 years, respectively, surgical and non-surgical treatment of moderate AIS showed similar subjective outcomes, but with a relevant smaller curve magnitude with surgical treatment.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE

III.

Abstract

PURPOSE

We report on outcomes of surgically versus (vs) non-surgically treated patients with moderate adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) after minimum of 29 years.

METHODS

AIS patients with a follow-up of  ≥ 41 years in the surgical group and  ≥ 29 years in the non-surgical group were included. Patients were treated surgically for primary curves  ≥ 45° vs non-surgically for curves  < 45° or refusal of surgery. Groups were matched for age, gender, comorbidities and primary curve severity. Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) was used to measure clinical outcomes and standard radiography to quantify curve severity at final follow-up.

RESULTS

In total, 16 patients (8 within each group, 75% females) with a median age of 14 (interquartile range (IQR) 2) years could be included and were followed up after 46 (IQR 12) years. All matched variables were similar for both groups, including the primary curve Cobb angles of 48° (IQR 17°) (surgical) vs 40° (IQR 19°) (non-surgical); p = 0.17). At final follow-up after a median of 47 (IQR 5) years for the surgical and 39 (IQR 19) years for the non-surgical group (p = 0.43), the ODI was similar for both groups (15 (IQR 13) points (surgical) vs 7 (IQR 15) points (non-surgical); p = 0.17) with, however, a primary curve magnitude lower in the surgical compared to the non-surgical group (38° (IQR 3°) vs 61° (IQR 33°); p = 0.01), respectively.

CONCLUSION

After around 47 and 39 years, respectively, surgical and non-surgical treatment of moderate AIS showed similar subjective outcomes, but with a relevant smaller curve magnitude with surgical treatment.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE

III.

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 05 Mar 2021
1 download since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Surgery
Health Sciences > Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
Language:English
Date:August 2020
Deposited On:05 Mar 2021 16:25
Last Modified:06 Mar 2021 21:00
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0940-6719
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00586-020-06509-1
PubMed ID:32588235

Download

Closed Access: Download allowed only for UZH members