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Hyperoxia in Portal Vein Causes Enhanced Vasoconstriction in Arterial Vascular Bed


Abstract

Long-term perfusion of liver grafts outside of the body may enable repair of poor-quality livers that are currently declined for transplantation, mitigating the global shortage of donor livers. In current ex vivo liver perfusion protocols, hyperoxic blood (arterial blood) is commonly delivered in the portal vein (PV). We perfused porcine livers for one week and investigated the effect of and mechanisms behind hyperoxia in the PV on hepatic arterial resistance. Applying PV hyperoxia in porcine livers (n = 5, arterial PV group), we observed an increased need for vasodilator Nitroprussiat (285 ± 162 ml/week) to maintain the reference hepatic artery flow of 0.25 l/min during ex vivo perfusion. With physiologic oxygenation (venous blood) in the PV the need for vasodilator could be reduced to 41 ± 34 ml/week (p = 0.011; n = 5, venous PV group). This phenomenon has not been reported previously, owing to the fact that such experiments are not feasible practically in vivo. We investigated the mechanism of the variation in HA resistance in response to blood oxygen saturation with a focus on the release of vasoactive substances, such as Endothelin 1 (ET-1) and nitric oxide (NO), at the protein and mRNA levels. However, no difference was found between groups for ET-1 and NO release. We propose direct oxygen sensing of endothelial cells and/or increased NO break down rate with hyperoxia as possible explanations for enhanced HA resistance.

Abstract

Long-term perfusion of liver grafts outside of the body may enable repair of poor-quality livers that are currently declined for transplantation, mitigating the global shortage of donor livers. In current ex vivo liver perfusion protocols, hyperoxic blood (arterial blood) is commonly delivered in the portal vein (PV). We perfused porcine livers for one week and investigated the effect of and mechanisms behind hyperoxia in the PV on hepatic arterial resistance. Applying PV hyperoxia in porcine livers (n = 5, arterial PV group), we observed an increased need for vasodilator Nitroprussiat (285 ± 162 ml/week) to maintain the reference hepatic artery flow of 0.25 l/min during ex vivo perfusion. With physiologic oxygenation (venous blood) in the PV the need for vasodilator could be reduced to 41 ± 34 ml/week (p = 0.011; n = 5, venous PV group). This phenomenon has not been reported previously, owing to the fact that such experiments are not feasible practically in vivo. We investigated the mechanism of the variation in HA resistance in response to blood oxygen saturation with a focus on the release of vasoactive substances, such as Endothelin 1 (ET-1) and nitric oxide (NO), at the protein and mRNA levels. However, no difference was found between groups for ET-1 and NO release. We propose direct oxygen sensing of endothelial cells and/or increased NO break down rate with hyperoxia as possible explanations for enhanced HA resistance.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Visceral and Transplantation Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Multidisciplinary
Uncontrolled Keywords:Multidisciplinary
Language:English
Date:1 December 2020
Deposited On:08 Feb 2021 16:20
Last Modified:09 Feb 2021 21:04
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:2045-2322
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-77915-0

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