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Current trends in vena cava reconstructive techniques with major liver resection: a systematic review


Baimas-George, Maria; Tschuor, Christoph; Watson, Michael; Sulzer, Jesse; Salibi, Patrick; Iannitti, David; Martinie, John B; Baker, Erin; Clavien, Pierre-Alain; Vrochides, Dionisios (2021). Current trends in vena cava reconstructive techniques with major liver resection: a systematic review. Langenbeck's Archives of Surgery, 406:25-38.

Abstract

Purpose: Historically, invasion of the inferior vena cava (IVC) represented advanced and often unresectable hepatic disease. With surgical and anesthetic innovations, IVC resection and reconstruction have become feasible in selected patients. This review assesses technical variations in reconstructive techniques and post-operative management.
Methods: A comprehensive literature search was performed according to PRISMA. Inclusion criteria were (i) peer-reviewed articles in English; (ii) at least three cases; (iii) hepatic IVC resection and reconstruction (January 2015-March 2020). Primary outcomes were reconstructive technique, anti-thrombotic regimen, post-operative IVC patency, and infection. Secondary outcomes included post-operative complications and malignant disease survival.
Results: Fourteen articles were included allowing for investigation of 351 individual patients. Analysis demonstrated significant heterogeneity in surgical reconstructive technique, anti-thrombotic management, and post-operative monitoring of patency. There was increased utilization of ex vivo approaches and decreased use of venovenous bypass compared with previously published reviews.
Conclusion: This review of literature published between 2015 and 2020 reveals persistent heterogeneity of hepatic IVC reconstructive techniques and peri-operative management. Increased utilization of ex vivo approaches and decreased use of venovenous bypass point towards improved operative techniques, peri-operative management, and anesthesia. In order to gain evidence for consensus on management, a registry would be beneficial.

Abstract

Purpose: Historically, invasion of the inferior vena cava (IVC) represented advanced and often unresectable hepatic disease. With surgical and anesthetic innovations, IVC resection and reconstruction have become feasible in selected patients. This review assesses technical variations in reconstructive techniques and post-operative management.
Methods: A comprehensive literature search was performed according to PRISMA. Inclusion criteria were (i) peer-reviewed articles in English; (ii) at least three cases; (iii) hepatic IVC resection and reconstruction (January 2015-March 2020). Primary outcomes were reconstructive technique, anti-thrombotic regimen, post-operative IVC patency, and infection. Secondary outcomes included post-operative complications and malignant disease survival.
Results: Fourteen articles were included allowing for investigation of 351 individual patients. Analysis demonstrated significant heterogeneity in surgical reconstructive technique, anti-thrombotic management, and post-operative monitoring of patency. There was increased utilization of ex vivo approaches and decreased use of venovenous bypass compared with previously published reviews.
Conclusion: This review of literature published between 2015 and 2020 reveals persistent heterogeneity of hepatic IVC reconstructive techniques and peri-operative management. Increased utilization of ex vivo approaches and decreased use of venovenous bypass point towards improved operative techniques, peri-operative management, and anesthesia. In order to gain evidence for consensus on management, a registry would be beneficial.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Visceral and Transplantation Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Surgery
Uncontrolled Keywords:Surgery
Language:English
Date:26 September 2021
Deposited On:08 Feb 2021 15:53
Last Modified:09 Feb 2021 21:04
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:1435-2443
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00423-020-01989-7

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