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Pancreatic Fistulas Following Distal Pancreatectomy are Unrelated to the Texture Quality of the Pancreas


Eshmuminov, Dilmurodjon; Karpovich, Iryna; Kapp, Joshua; Töpfer, Antonia; Endhardt, Katharina; Oberkofler, Christian; Petrowsky, Henrik; Lenggenhager, Daniela; Tschuor, Christoph; Clavien, Pierre-Alain (2021). Pancreatic Fistulas Following Distal Pancreatectomy are Unrelated to the Texture Quality of the Pancreas. Langenbeck's Archives of Surgery:Epub ahead of print.

Abstract

Purpose

The relevance of pancreatic texture for pancreatic fistula (POPF) formation after distal pancreatectomy (DP) remains ill defined. Recent POPF definition adjustments and common subjective pancreatic texture assessment are further drawbacks in the investigation of pancreatic texture as a factor for POPF development after DP.
Methods

The predictive value of pancreatic texture by histologic assessment was investigated for POPF formation after DP, respecting the updated 2016 fistula definition. Histologic evaluation at the resection margin included amount of steatosis, degree of fibrosis, and pancreatic duct size.
Results

A total of 102 patients who underwent DP were included. Thirty-six patients developed POPF. There was no difference in histologic variables in patients with and without POPF. In the univariate analysis, none of the three histologic features showed significant correlation with POPF formation. The ROC (receiver operating characteristic) curve demonstrated poor utility for the grade of steatosis 0.481 ± 0.058 (p = 0.75) and grade of fibrosis 0.466 ± 0.058 (p = 0.57) as predictive factors for POPF formation.
Conclusion

Results indicate that pancreatic texture does not predict POPF formation following DP. This is particularly relevant in the context of the increasing use of robotic and laparoscopic approaches for DPs with limited clinical pancreatic texture assessment by palpation.

Abstract

Purpose

The relevance of pancreatic texture for pancreatic fistula (POPF) formation after distal pancreatectomy (DP) remains ill defined. Recent POPF definition adjustments and common subjective pancreatic texture assessment are further drawbacks in the investigation of pancreatic texture as a factor for POPF development after DP.
Methods

The predictive value of pancreatic texture by histologic assessment was investigated for POPF formation after DP, respecting the updated 2016 fistula definition. Histologic evaluation at the resection margin included amount of steatosis, degree of fibrosis, and pancreatic duct size.
Results

A total of 102 patients who underwent DP were included. Thirty-six patients developed POPF. There was no difference in histologic variables in patients with and without POPF. In the univariate analysis, none of the three histologic features showed significant correlation with POPF formation. The ROC (receiver operating characteristic) curve demonstrated poor utility for the grade of steatosis 0.481 ± 0.058 (p = 0.75) and grade of fibrosis 0.466 ± 0.058 (p = 0.57) as predictive factors for POPF formation.
Conclusion

Results indicate that pancreatic texture does not predict POPF formation following DP. This is particularly relevant in the context of the increasing use of robotic and laparoscopic approaches for DPs with limited clinical pancreatic texture assessment by palpation.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Visceral and Transplantation Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Surgery
Uncontrolled Keywords:Surgery
Language:English
Date:8 January 2021
Deposited On:08 Feb 2021 16:11
Last Modified:09 Feb 2021 21:05
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:1435-2443
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00423-020-02071-y
PubMed ID:33420516

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