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Urological Outcome after Fetal Spina Bifida Repair: Data from the Zurich Cohort


Mazzone, Luca; Hölscher, Alice Catherine; Moehrlen, Ueli; Gobet, Rita; Meuli, Martin; Horst, Maya (2020). Urological Outcome after Fetal Spina Bifida Repair: Data from the Zurich Cohort. Fetal Diagnosis and Therapy, 47(12):882-888.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD) represents a severe burden for patients with open spina bifida (OSB). The effect of fetal OSB repair on the urological outcome remains unclear, as controversial data exist. The aim of this study was to further increment existing outcome data and to demonstrate that our earlier published positive preliminary results are not erratic.

METHODS

Data from standardized urological follow-up appointments of patients with fetal OSB repair operated at our center were analyzed. Data were obtained from urodynamic studies (UDSs) and radiologic exams performed in the newborn (gestational age 37-39 weeks), at ages of 6, 12, 18, and 24 months, and then at yearly intervals.

RESULTS

Of 82 patients (mean age 2.6 years, range 6 months to 7 years), 26 (32%) had a normal bladder function as demonstrated by UDSs. Of the 56 (68%) patients with NLUTD, 29 (51%) patients showed initially a normal UDS, but developed NLUTD in the follow-up, 19 (66%) of them spontaneously and another 10 (34%) in association with growth and development, or surgery of inclusion cysts. Radiologic abnormalities (upper tract dilatation and vesico-uretero-renal reflux) were seen in 15%, mainly patients with NLUTD.

CONCLUSION

Our results add an important set of information to the existing body of evidence. The data reconfirm our earlier published favorable preliminary results and support other studies that show a possible benefit of prenatal OSB repair on the urological outcome, but they also demonstrate that the positive effect remains limited.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD) represents a severe burden for patients with open spina bifida (OSB). The effect of fetal OSB repair on the urological outcome remains unclear, as controversial data exist. The aim of this study was to further increment existing outcome data and to demonstrate that our earlier published positive preliminary results are not erratic.

METHODS

Data from standardized urological follow-up appointments of patients with fetal OSB repair operated at our center were analyzed. Data were obtained from urodynamic studies (UDSs) and radiologic exams performed in the newborn (gestational age 37-39 weeks), at ages of 6, 12, 18, and 24 months, and then at yearly intervals.

RESULTS

Of 82 patients (mean age 2.6 years, range 6 months to 7 years), 26 (32%) had a normal bladder function as demonstrated by UDSs. Of the 56 (68%) patients with NLUTD, 29 (51%) patients showed initially a normal UDS, but developed NLUTD in the follow-up, 19 (66%) of them spontaneously and another 10 (34%) in association with growth and development, or surgery of inclusion cysts. Radiologic abnormalities (upper tract dilatation and vesico-uretero-renal reflux) were seen in 15%, mainly patients with NLUTD.

CONCLUSION

Our results add an important set of information to the existing body of evidence. The data reconfirm our earlier published favorable preliminary results and support other studies that show a possible benefit of prenatal OSB repair on the urological outcome, but they also demonstrate that the positive effect remains limited.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Pediatrics, Perinatology and Child Health
Health Sciences > Embryology
Health Sciences > Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Imaging
Health Sciences > Obstetrics and Gynecology
Language:English
Date:2020
Deposited On:10 Feb 2021 13:47
Last Modified:27 Jan 2022 05:40
Publisher:Karger
ISSN:1015-3837
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1159/000509392
PubMed ID:32894833
  • Content: Published Version
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0)