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Targeting Therapeutic Antibodies to the CNS: a Comparative Study of Intrathecal, Intravenous, and Subcutaneous Anti-Nogo A Antibody Treatment after Stroke in Rats


Wahl, Anna-Sophia; Correa, Daphne; Imobersteg, Stefan; Maurer, Michael Andreas; Kaiser, Julia; Augath, Marc Aurel; Schwab, Martin E (2020). Targeting Therapeutic Antibodies to the CNS: a Comparative Study of Intrathecal, Intravenous, and Subcutaneous Anti-Nogo A Antibody Treatment after Stroke in Rats. Neurotherapeutics, 17(3):1153-1159.

Abstract

Antibody-based therapeutics targeting CNS antigens emerge as promising treatments in neurology. However, access to the CNS is limited by the blood-brain barrier. We examined the effects of a neurite growth-enhancing anti-Nogo A antibody therapy following 3 routes of administration-intrathecal (i.t.), intravenous (i.v.), and subcutaneous (s.c.)-after large photothrombotic strokes in adult rats. Intrathecal treatment of full-length IgG anti-Nogo A antibodies enhanced recovery of the grasping function, but intravenous or subcutaneous administration had no detectable effect in spite of large amounts of antibodies in the peripheral circulation. Thus, in contrast to intravenous and subcutaneous delivery, intrathecal administration is an effective and reliable way to target CNS antigens. Our data reveal that antibody delivery to the CNS is far from trivial. While intrathecal application is feasible and guarantees defined antibody doses in the effective range for a biological function, the identification and establishment of easier routes of administration remains an important task to facilitate antibody-based future therapies of CNS disorders.

Abstract

Antibody-based therapeutics targeting CNS antigens emerge as promising treatments in neurology. However, access to the CNS is limited by the blood-brain barrier. We examined the effects of a neurite growth-enhancing anti-Nogo A antibody therapy following 3 routes of administration-intrathecal (i.t.), intravenous (i.v.), and subcutaneous (s.c.)-after large photothrombotic strokes in adult rats. Intrathecal treatment of full-length IgG anti-Nogo A antibodies enhanced recovery of the grasping function, but intravenous or subcutaneous administration had no detectable effect in spite of large amounts of antibodies in the peripheral circulation. Thus, in contrast to intravenous and subcutaneous delivery, intrathecal administration is an effective and reliable way to target CNS antigens. Our data reveal that antibody delivery to the CNS is far from trivial. While intrathecal application is feasible and guarantees defined antibody doses in the effective range for a biological function, the identification and establishment of easier routes of administration remains an important task to facilitate antibody-based future therapies of CNS disorders.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute for Regenerative Medicine (IREM)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Pharmacology
Health Sciences > Neurology (clinical)
Health Sciences > Pharmacology (medical)
Language:English
Date:July 2020
Deposited On:10 Feb 2021 15:36
Last Modified:01 Mar 2021 16:29
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:1878-7479
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s13311-020-00864-z
PubMed ID:32378027

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