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Feasibility and Efficacy of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation After COVID-19


Hermann, Matthias; Pekacka-Egli, Anna-Maria; Witassek, Fabienne; Baumgaertner, Reiner; Schoendorf, Sabine; Spielmanns, Marc (2020). Feasibility and Efficacy of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation After COVID-19. American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, 99(10):865-869.

Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic affects a large number of patients with a rapid progression of respiratory failure often requiring hospitalization or intensive care unit treatment in some patients. Survivors of severe COVID-19 experience persistent weakness and cardiorespiratory failure. Feasibility and potential benefit of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation after COVID-19 remains unclear. Therefore, we retrospectively analyzed a cohort of COVID-19 patients in a single-center inpatient rehabilitation clinic and describe performance and outcome during cardiopulmonary rehabilitation.Patients were referred from acute care hospitals for rehabilitation after severe COVID-19. The cohort (N = 28) was divided in ventilated or not ventilated patients for further analysis. Fifty percent were female, the mean age was 66 yrs, and patients stayed in the acute hospital for 19.3 ± 10.7 days before referral for cardiopulmonary rehabilitation. Seventeen patients (61%) needed previous intensive care unit treatment in the acute care hospital. Risk factors, assessments, and questionnaires on admission were comparable in both groups. Significant enhancements were observed in 6-min walking test and feeling thermometer, which were independent of previous ventilation status.In conclusion, comprehensive cardiopulmonary rehabilitation after COVID-19 is safe, feasible, and effective. Improvements in physical performance and subjective health status were independent of previous ventilation.

Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic affects a large number of patients with a rapid progression of respiratory failure often requiring hospitalization or intensive care unit treatment in some patients. Survivors of severe COVID-19 experience persistent weakness and cardiorespiratory failure. Feasibility and potential benefit of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation after COVID-19 remains unclear. Therefore, we retrospectively analyzed a cohort of COVID-19 patients in a single-center inpatient rehabilitation clinic and describe performance and outcome during cardiopulmonary rehabilitation.Patients were referred from acute care hospitals for rehabilitation after severe COVID-19. The cohort (N = 28) was divided in ventilated or not ventilated patients for further analysis. Fifty percent were female, the mean age was 66 yrs, and patients stayed in the acute hospital for 19.3 ± 10.7 days before referral for cardiopulmonary rehabilitation. Seventeen patients (61%) needed previous intensive care unit treatment in the acute care hospital. Risk factors, assessments, and questionnaires on admission were comparable in both groups. Significant enhancements were observed in 6-min walking test and feeling thermometer, which were independent of previous ventilation status.In conclusion, comprehensive cardiopulmonary rehabilitation after COVID-19 is safe, feasible, and effective. Improvements in physical performance and subjective health status were independent of previous ventilation.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
Health Sciences > Rehabilitation
Language:English
Date:October 2020
Deposited On:11 Feb 2021 10:37
Last Modified:12 Feb 2021 21:01
Publisher:Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:0894-9115
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/PHM.0000000000001549
PubMed ID:32732746

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