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Links between aldosterone excess and metabolic complications: A comprehensive review


Bothou, C; Beuschlein, F; Spyroglou, A (2020). Links between aldosterone excess and metabolic complications: A comprehensive review. Diabetes & Metabolism, 46(1):1-7.

Abstract

Shortly after the first description of primary aldosteronism (PA) appeared in the 1950s by Jerome Conn, an association of the condition with diabetes mellitus was documented. However, a clear pathophysiological interrelationship linking the two entities has yet to be established. Nevertheless, so far, many mechanisms contributing to insulin resistance and dysregulation of glucose uptake have been described. At the same time, many observational studies have reported an increased prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) among patients with PA. Regarding the relationship between aldosterone levels and obesity, a vicious cycle of adipokine-induced aldosterone production and aldosterone adipogenic action may be further contributing to MetS manifestations in PA patients. However, whether aldosterone excess affects lipid metabolism is still under investigation. Also, recent findings of the coexistence of glucocorticoid excess in many cases of PA highlight the need for further studies to examine the presumed link between high aldosterone levels and various metabolic parameters. In the present review, our focus is to comprehensively present the spectrum of available research findings concerning the possible associations between aldosterone excess and metabolic alterations, including impaired glucose metabolism, insulin resistance and, consequently, diabetes, altered lipid metabolism and the development of fatty liver. In addition, the complex relationship between obesity and aldosterone is discussed in detail.

Abstract

Shortly after the first description of primary aldosteronism (PA) appeared in the 1950s by Jerome Conn, an association of the condition with diabetes mellitus was documented. However, a clear pathophysiological interrelationship linking the two entities has yet to be established. Nevertheless, so far, many mechanisms contributing to insulin resistance and dysregulation of glucose uptake have been described. At the same time, many observational studies have reported an increased prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) among patients with PA. Regarding the relationship between aldosterone levels and obesity, a vicious cycle of adipokine-induced aldosterone production and aldosterone adipogenic action may be further contributing to MetS manifestations in PA patients. However, whether aldosterone excess affects lipid metabolism is still under investigation. Also, recent findings of the coexistence of glucocorticoid excess in many cases of PA highlight the need for further studies to examine the presumed link between high aldosterone levels and various metabolic parameters. In the present review, our focus is to comprehensively present the spectrum of available research findings concerning the possible associations between aldosterone excess and metabolic alterations, including impaired glucose metabolism, insulin resistance and, consequently, diabetes, altered lipid metabolism and the development of fatty liver. In addition, the complex relationship between obesity and aldosterone is discussed in detail.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Endocrinology and Diabetology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Internal Medicine
Health Sciences > Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
Life Sciences > Endocrinology
Language:English
Date:February 2020
Deposited On:15 Feb 2021 13:03
Last Modified:16 Feb 2021 21:01
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1262-3636
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.diabet.2019.02.003
PubMed ID:30825519

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