Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

The potential pathophysiological role of aldosterone and the mineralocorticoid receptor in anxiety and depression - Lessons from primary aldosteronism


Murck, Harald; Schlageter, Lena; Schneider, Anna; Adolf, Christian; Heinrich, Daniel; Quinkler, Marcus; Beuschlein, Felix; Reincke, Martin; Künzel, Heike (2020). The potential pathophysiological role of aldosterone and the mineralocorticoid receptor in anxiety and depression - Lessons from primary aldosteronism. Journal of Psychiatric Research, 130:82-88.

Abstract

High levels of aldosterone appear to be related to depressive and anxiety related behavior as demonstrated in therapy refractory depression and primary aldosteronism (PA). We analyzed data from a large register of patients with PA in order to clarify mediators and moderators of this influence. Up to 624 subjects were analyzed, however not all subjects had a complete dataset. Due to the known gender differences in subjects with PA we performed the analyses adjusted for gender. We compared subjects with (PHQ-9 ≥ 5) vs. no depressive symptomatology. 56% of men and 61% of women met this depression criterion. In women aldosterone concentration was significantly higher in depressed patients and renin levels were significantly increased with higher anxiety scores. This was not found in men. Depressive symptoms in men and women were significantly associated to BMI (men: dep vs non-dep: 29.6 vs. 28.4, p < 0.05; women: 26.9 vs. 24.5) and body weight (p < 0.05). Neither blood pressure nor electrolytes were different between depression groups. The relationship of these parameters to anxiety was less pronounced and partially unexpected: only in men higher anxiety (GAD ≥ 5) was related to lower systolic blood pressure. In conclusion, higher aldosterone appears to be associated with depressive symptoms in women, but less so in men with PA. BMI appears to be strongly and independently associated with depressive symptoms in patients with PA, independent of gender. Further studies are required to clarify the causal relationship.

Abstract

High levels of aldosterone appear to be related to depressive and anxiety related behavior as demonstrated in therapy refractory depression and primary aldosteronism (PA). We analyzed data from a large register of patients with PA in order to clarify mediators and moderators of this influence. Up to 624 subjects were analyzed, however not all subjects had a complete dataset. Due to the known gender differences in subjects with PA we performed the analyses adjusted for gender. We compared subjects with (PHQ-9 ≥ 5) vs. no depressive symptomatology. 56% of men and 61% of women met this depression criterion. In women aldosterone concentration was significantly higher in depressed patients and renin levels were significantly increased with higher anxiety scores. This was not found in men. Depressive symptoms in men and women were significantly associated to BMI (men: dep vs non-dep: 29.6 vs. 28.4, p < 0.05; women: 26.9 vs. 24.5) and body weight (p < 0.05). Neither blood pressure nor electrolytes were different between depression groups. The relationship of these parameters to anxiety was less pronounced and partially unexpected: only in men higher anxiety (GAD ≥ 5) was related to lower systolic blood pressure. In conclusion, higher aldosterone appears to be associated with depressive symptoms in women, but less so in men with PA. BMI appears to be strongly and independently associated with depressive symptoms in patients with PA, independent of gender. Further studies are required to clarify the causal relationship.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
2 citations in Web of Science®
2 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Endocrinology and Diabetology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Psychiatry and Mental Health
Life Sciences > Biological Psychiatry
Language:English
Date:November 2020
Deposited On:16 Feb 2021 10:22
Last Modified:17 Feb 2021 21:00
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0022-3956
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychires.2020.07.006
PubMed ID:32798773

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

Get full-text in a library