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β-Phenylethylamine as a natural food additive shows antimicrobial activity against Listeria monocytogenes on Ready-to-Eat Foods


Muchaamba, Francis; Stephan, Roger; Tasara, Taurai (2020). β-Phenylethylamine as a natural food additive shows antimicrobial activity against Listeria monocytogenes on Ready-to-Eat Foods. Foods, 9(10):1363.

Abstract

Listeria monocytogenes is an important foodborne pathogen and a major cause of death associated with bacterial foodborne infections. Control of L. monocytogenes on most ready-to-eat (RTE) foods remains a challenge. The potential use of β-phenylethylamine (PEA) as an organic antimicrobial against L. monocytogenes was evaluated in an effort to develop a new intervention for its control. Using a collection of 62 clinical and food-related isolates we determined the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of PEA against L. monocytogenes in different broth and agar media. Bologna type sausage (lyoner) and smoked salmon were used as food model systems to validate the in vitro findings. PEA had a growth inhibitory and bactericidal effect against L. monocytogenes both in in vitro experiments as well as on lyoner and smoked salmon. The MIC’s ranged from 8 to 12.5 mg/mL. Furthermore, PEA also inhibited L. monocytogenes biofilm formation. Based on good manufacturing practices as a prerequisite, the application of PEA to RTE products might be an additional hurdle to limit L. monocytogenes growth thereby increasing food safety.

Abstract

Listeria monocytogenes is an important foodborne pathogen and a major cause of death associated with bacterial foodborne infections. Control of L. monocytogenes on most ready-to-eat (RTE) foods remains a challenge. The potential use of β-phenylethylamine (PEA) as an organic antimicrobial against L. monocytogenes was evaluated in an effort to develop a new intervention for its control. Using a collection of 62 clinical and food-related isolates we determined the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of PEA against L. monocytogenes in different broth and agar media. Bologna type sausage (lyoner) and smoked salmon were used as food model systems to validate the in vitro findings. PEA had a growth inhibitory and bactericidal effect against L. monocytogenes both in in vitro experiments as well as on lyoner and smoked salmon. The MIC’s ranged from 8 to 12.5 mg/mL. Furthermore, PEA also inhibited L. monocytogenes biofilm formation. Based on good manufacturing practices as a prerequisite, the application of PEA to RTE products might be an additional hurdle to limit L. monocytogenes growth thereby increasing food safety.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Food Safety and Hygiene
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Food Science
Life Sciences > Microbiology
Social Sciences & Humanities > Health (social science)
Health Sciences > Health Professions (miscellaneous)
Life Sciences > Plant Science
Language:English
Date:25 September 2020
Deposited On:15 Feb 2021 17:28
Last Modified:18 Feb 2021 12:24
Publisher:MDPI Publishing
ISSN:2304-8158
OA Status:Gold
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9101363

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