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Machine learning applied to simulations of collisions between rotating, differentiated planets


Timpe, Miles L; Han Veiga, Maria; Knabenhans, Mischa; Stadel, Joachim; Marelli, Stefano (2020). Machine learning applied to simulations of collisions between rotating, differentiated planets. Computational Astrophysics and Cosmology, 7(1):2.

Abstract

In the late stages of terrestrial planet formation, pairwise collisions between planetary-sized bodies act as the fundamental agent of planet growth. These collisions can lead to either growth or disruption of the bodies involved and are largely responsible for shaping the final characteristics of the planets. Despite their critical role in planet formation, an accurate treatment of collisions has yet to be realized. While semi-analytic methods have been proposed, they remain limited to a narrow set of post-impact properties and have only achieved relatively low accuracies. However, the rise of machine learning and access to increased computing power have enabled novel data-driven approaches. In this work, we show that data-driven emulation techniques are capable of classifying and predicting the outcome of collisions with high accuracy and are generalizable to any quantifiable post-impact quantity. In particular, we focus on the dataset requirements, training pipeline, and classification and regression performance for four distinct data-driven techniques from machine learning (ensemble methods and neural networks) and uncertainty quantification (Gaussian processes and polynomial chaos expansion). We compare these methods to existing analytic and semi-analytic methods. Such data-driven emulators are poised to replace the methods currently used in N-body simulations, while avoiding the cost of direct simulation. This work is based on a new set of 14,856 SPH simulations of pairwise collisions between rotating, differentiated bodies at all possible mutual orientations.

Abstract

In the late stages of terrestrial planet formation, pairwise collisions between planetary-sized bodies act as the fundamental agent of planet growth. These collisions can lead to either growth or disruption of the bodies involved and are largely responsible for shaping the final characteristics of the planets. Despite their critical role in planet formation, an accurate treatment of collisions has yet to be realized. While semi-analytic methods have been proposed, they remain limited to a narrow set of post-impact properties and have only achieved relatively low accuracies. However, the rise of machine learning and access to increased computing power have enabled novel data-driven approaches. In this work, we show that data-driven emulation techniques are capable of classifying and predicting the outcome of collisions with high accuracy and are generalizable to any quantifiable post-impact quantity. In particular, we focus on the dataset requirements, training pipeline, and classification and regression performance for four distinct data-driven techniques from machine learning (ensemble methods and neural networks) and uncertainty quantification (Gaussian processes and polynomial chaos expansion). We compare these methods to existing analytic and semi-analytic methods. Such data-driven emulators are poised to replace the methods currently used in N-body simulations, while avoiding the cost of direct simulation. This work is based on a new set of 14,856 SPH simulations of pairwise collisions between rotating, differentiated bodies at all possible mutual orientations.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute for Computational Science
Dewey Decimal Classification:530 Physics
Language:English
Date:1 December 2020
Deposited On:15 Feb 2021 07:13
Last Modified:15 Feb 2021 07:14
Publisher:SpringerOpen
ISSN:2197-7909
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1186/s40668-020-00034-6
Project Information:
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant ID200020_149848
  • : Project TitleComputational Astrophysics

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