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1,25(OH)$_{2}$ vitamin D$_{3}$ stimulates active phosphate transport but not paracellular phosphate absorption in mouse intestine


Hernando, Nati; Pastor-Arroyo, Eva Maria; Marks, Joanne; Schnitzbauer, Udo; Knöpfel, Thomas; Bürki, Matthias; Bettoni, Carla; Wagner, Carsten A (2021). 1,25(OH)$_{2}$ vitamin D$_{3}$ stimulates active phosphate transport but not paracellular phosphate absorption in mouse intestine. Journal of Physiology, 599(4):1131-1150.

Abstract

Intestinal absorption of phosphate is stimulated by 1,25(OH)$_{2}$ vitamin D$_{3.}$ At least two distinct mechanisms underlie phosphate absorption in the gut, an active transcellular transport requiring the Na$^{+}$ /phosphate cotransporter NaPi-IIb/Slc34a2, and a poorly characterized paracellular passive pathway. 1,25(OH)$_{2}$ vitamin D$_{3}$ stimulates NaPi-IIb expression and function and loss of NaPi-IIb reduces intestinal phosphate absorption. However, it is remains unknown whether NaPi-IIb is the only target for hormonal regulation by 1,25(OH)$_{2}$ vitamin D$_{3}$ . Here we compared the effects of intraperitoneal administration of 1,25(OH)$_{2}$ vitamin D$_{3}$ (2 days, once per day) in wild type and intestinal-specific Slc34a2 deficient mice, and analyzed trans- vs paracellular routes of phosphate absorption. We found that treatment stimulated active transport of phosphate only in jejunum of wild type mice, though NaPi-IIb protein expression was upregulated in jejunum and ileum . In contrast, 1,25(OH)$_{2}$ vitamin D$_{3}$ administration had no effect in Slc34a2 deficient mice, suggesting that the hormone specifically regulates NaPi-IIb expression. In both groups, 1,25(OH)$_{2}$ vitamin D$_{3}$ elicited the expected increase of plasma FGF23 and reduction of PTH. Treatment resulted in hyperphosphaturia (and hypercalciuria) in both genotypes, though mice remained normophosphatemic. While increased intestinal absorption and higher FGF23 can trigger the hyperphosphaturic response in wild types, only the second one can explain the renal response in Slc34a2 deficient mice. Thus, 1,25(OH)$_{2}$ vitamin D$_{3}$ stimulates intestinal phosphate absorption by acting on the active transcellular pathway mostly mediated by NaPi-IIb while the paracellular pathway appears not to be affected. Intestinal absorption of phosphate proceeds via an active/transcellular route mostly mediated by NaPi-IIb/Slc34a2 and a poorly characterized passive/paracellular pathway. Intestinal phosphate absorption and expression of NaPi-IIb are stimulated by 1,25(OH)$_{2}$ vitamin D$_{3}$ but whether NaPi-IIb is the only target under hormonal control remains unknown. We report that administration of 1,25(OH)$_{2}$ vitamin D$_{3}$ to wild type mice results in the expected increase in active transport of phosphate in jejunum, without changing paracellular fluxes. Consequently, treatment failed to alter phosphate transport in intestinal-depleted Slc34a2 mice. In both genotypes, 1,25(OH)$_{2}$ vitamin D$_{3}$ induced similar hyperphosphaturic responses and changes in FGF23 and PTH. While urinary phosphate loss induced by administration of 1,25(OH)$_{2}$ vitamin D$_{3}$ did not alter plasma phosphate, further studies should investigate whether chronic administration would lead to phosphate imbalance in mice with reduced active intestinal absorption. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Abstract

Intestinal absorption of phosphate is stimulated by 1,25(OH)$_{2}$ vitamin D$_{3.}$ At least two distinct mechanisms underlie phosphate absorption in the gut, an active transcellular transport requiring the Na$^{+}$ /phosphate cotransporter NaPi-IIb/Slc34a2, and a poorly characterized paracellular passive pathway. 1,25(OH)$_{2}$ vitamin D$_{3}$ stimulates NaPi-IIb expression and function and loss of NaPi-IIb reduces intestinal phosphate absorption. However, it is remains unknown whether NaPi-IIb is the only target for hormonal regulation by 1,25(OH)$_{2}$ vitamin D$_{3}$ . Here we compared the effects of intraperitoneal administration of 1,25(OH)$_{2}$ vitamin D$_{3}$ (2 days, once per day) in wild type and intestinal-specific Slc34a2 deficient mice, and analyzed trans- vs paracellular routes of phosphate absorption. We found that treatment stimulated active transport of phosphate only in jejunum of wild type mice, though NaPi-IIb protein expression was upregulated in jejunum and ileum . In contrast, 1,25(OH)$_{2}$ vitamin D$_{3}$ administration had no effect in Slc34a2 deficient mice, suggesting that the hormone specifically regulates NaPi-IIb expression. In both groups, 1,25(OH)$_{2}$ vitamin D$_{3}$ elicited the expected increase of plasma FGF23 and reduction of PTH. Treatment resulted in hyperphosphaturia (and hypercalciuria) in both genotypes, though mice remained normophosphatemic. While increased intestinal absorption and higher FGF23 can trigger the hyperphosphaturic response in wild types, only the second one can explain the renal response in Slc34a2 deficient mice. Thus, 1,25(OH)$_{2}$ vitamin D$_{3}$ stimulates intestinal phosphate absorption by acting on the active transcellular pathway mostly mediated by NaPi-IIb while the paracellular pathway appears not to be affected. Intestinal absorption of phosphate proceeds via an active/transcellular route mostly mediated by NaPi-IIb/Slc34a2 and a poorly characterized passive/paracellular pathway. Intestinal phosphate absorption and expression of NaPi-IIb are stimulated by 1,25(OH)$_{2}$ vitamin D$_{3}$ but whether NaPi-IIb is the only target under hormonal control remains unknown. We report that administration of 1,25(OH)$_{2}$ vitamin D$_{3}$ to wild type mice results in the expected increase in active transport of phosphate in jejunum, without changing paracellular fluxes. Consequently, treatment failed to alter phosphate transport in intestinal-depleted Slc34a2 mice. In both genotypes, 1,25(OH)$_{2}$ vitamin D$_{3}$ induced similar hyperphosphaturic responses and changes in FGF23 and PTH. While urinary phosphate loss induced by administration of 1,25(OH)$_{2}$ vitamin D$_{3}$ did not alter plasma phosphate, further studies should investigate whether chronic administration would lead to phosphate imbalance in mice with reduced active intestinal absorption. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Physiology
Language:English
Date:1 February 2021
Deposited On:19 Feb 2021 15:44
Last Modified:20 Feb 2021 21:00
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0022-3751
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1113/JP280345
PubMed ID:33200827

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