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Training and racing behavior of recreational runners by race distance—Results from the NURMI Study (Step 1)


Knechtle, Beat; Tanous, Derrick R; Wirnitzer, Gerold; Leitzmann, Claus; Rosemann, Thomas; Scheer, Volker; Wirnitzer, Katharina (2021). Training and racing behavior of recreational runners by race distance—Results from the NURMI Study (Step 1). Frontiers in Physiology, 12:620404.

Abstract

The present study investigated pre-race preparation of a large sample of recreational runners competing in different race distances (e.g., shorter than half-marathon, half-marathon, marathon and ultra-marathon). An online questionnaire was used and a total of 3,835 participants completed the survey. Of those participants, 2,864 (75%) met the inclusion criteria and 1,628 (57%) women and 1,236 (43%) men remained after data clearance. Participants were categorized according to race distance in half-marathon (HM), and marathon/ultra-marathon (M/UM). Marathon and ultra-marathon data were pooled since the marathon distance is included in an ultra-marathon. The most important findings were (i) marathon and ultra-marathon runners were more likely to seek advice from a professional trainer, and (ii) spring was most commonly reported across all subgroups as the planned season for racing, (iii) training volume increased with increasing race distance, and (iv) male runners invested more time in training compared to female runners. In summary, runners competing in different race distances prepare differently for their planned race.<jats:bold>Clinical Trial Registration:</jats:bold><jats:ext-link>www.ClinicalTrials.gov</jats:ext-link>, identifier ISRCTN73074080. Retrospectively registered 12th June 2015.

Abstract

The present study investigated pre-race preparation of a large sample of recreational runners competing in different race distances (e.g., shorter than half-marathon, half-marathon, marathon and ultra-marathon). An online questionnaire was used and a total of 3,835 participants completed the survey. Of those participants, 2,864 (75%) met the inclusion criteria and 1,628 (57%) women and 1,236 (43%) men remained after data clearance. Participants were categorized according to race distance in half-marathon (HM), and marathon/ultra-marathon (M/UM). Marathon and ultra-marathon data were pooled since the marathon distance is included in an ultra-marathon. The most important findings were (i) marathon and ultra-marathon runners were more likely to seek advice from a professional trainer, and (ii) spring was most commonly reported across all subgroups as the planned season for racing, (iii) training volume increased with increasing race distance, and (iv) male runners invested more time in training compared to female runners. In summary, runners competing in different race distances prepare differently for their planned race.<jats:bold>Clinical Trial Registration:</jats:bold><jats:ext-link>www.ClinicalTrials.gov</jats:ext-link>, identifier ISRCTN73074080. Retrospectively registered 12th June 2015.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of General Practice
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Physiology (medical), Physiology
Language:English
Date:4 February 2021
Deposited On:19 Feb 2021 16:09
Last Modified:19 Feb 2021 16:09
Publisher:Frontiers Research Foundation
ISSN:1664-042X
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2021.620404

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