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Trauma‐induced primary hypoparathyroidism following severe bite wound injury to the neck in a dog


Wolf, Johanna; Vigani, Alessio; Schaer, Michael (2020). Trauma‐induced primary hypoparathyroidism following severe bite wound injury to the neck in a dog. Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care, 30(3):331-335.

Abstract

Objective: To describe the clinical presentation and outcome of a dog with primary hypoparathyroidism secondary to cervical bite wounds.
Case Summary: A 3-year-old male intact Chihuahua presented after being attacked by a large breed dog. The dog sustained severe cervical lacerations, exposing the trachea and jugular veins.A portion of the right thyroid gland was missing. The dog was stabilized before wound debridement and closure. Ionized calcium concentrations were within reference range at the time of presentation. Forty-eight hours after the initial trauma, the dog was presented in lateral recumbency with signs of hypovolemic shock, muscle tremors, and hyperthermia. Bloodwork showed severe ionized hypocalcemiawith low normal parathyroid hormone concentration consistent with acute primary hypoparathyroidism. The dog was managed initially with IV calcium gluconate and calcitriol, then long-term oral calcium carbonate and vitamin D3. After 6 months, the dog was successfully weaned off calcium supplementation.
New or Unique Information Provided: This is the first described case of traumatic primary hypoparathyroidism after a bite injury to the neck in a dog.

Abstract

Objective: To describe the clinical presentation and outcome of a dog with primary hypoparathyroidism secondary to cervical bite wounds.
Case Summary: A 3-year-old male intact Chihuahua presented after being attacked by a large breed dog. The dog sustained severe cervical lacerations, exposing the trachea and jugular veins.A portion of the right thyroid gland was missing. The dog was stabilized before wound debridement and closure. Ionized calcium concentrations were within reference range at the time of presentation. Forty-eight hours after the initial trauma, the dog was presented in lateral recumbency with signs of hypovolemic shock, muscle tremors, and hyperthermia. Bloodwork showed severe ionized hypocalcemiawith low normal parathyroid hormone concentration consistent with acute primary hypoparathyroidism. The dog was managed initially with IV calcium gluconate and calcitriol, then long-term oral calcium carbonate and vitamin D3. After 6 months, the dog was successfully weaned off calcium supplementation.
New or Unique Information Provided: This is the first described case of traumatic primary hypoparathyroidism after a bite injury to the neck in a dog.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > General Veterinary
Uncontrolled Keywords:General Veterinary
Language:English
Date:1 May 2020
Deposited On:16 Feb 2021 17:20
Last Modified:17 Feb 2021 21:01
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1476-4431
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/vec.12923

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