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Efficacy of a single session in‐series hemoperfusion and hemodialysis in the management of carprofen overdose in two dogs


Fick, Meghan E; Messenger, Kristen M; Vigani, Alessio (2020). Efficacy of a single session in‐series hemoperfusion and hemodialysis in the management of carprofen overdose in two dogs. Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care, 30(2):226-231.

Abstract

Objective: To describe the efficacy of in-series hemoperfusion and hemodialysis in 2 dogs with carprofen overdose.
Case Summary: This report describes the treatment of 2 dogs following accidental carprofen overdoses who underwent a single in-series hemoperfusion and hemodialysis session. Serial serum carprofen concentrations were measured before, during, and after the session. The first patient’s session lasted 5 hours, with the largest decrease in serum carprofen concentrations occurring during the first hour of treatment. The carprofen clearance during the following 4 hours of treatment decreased substantially compared to the first hour and was not different from the patient’s intrinsic clearance of carprofen after the session was completed. Based on the findings from the first case, the second patient was treated with a 1 hour single hemoperfusion and hemodialysis session. Our results support the hypothesis that carprofen is not effectively removed by conventional hemodialysis and the efficacy of hemoperfusion is short lived due to rapid saturation of the charcoal filter. Once filter saturation occurs, the extracorporeal session is no longer efficacious. Using in-series hemoperfusion and hemodialysis is of benefit to correct the side effects seen with hemoperfusion alone, and hourly charcoal filter replacementmay extend the efficacy of treatment in removing carprofen.
New or Unique Information Provided: This is the first published report of in-series hemoperfusion and hemodialysis being used to treat carprofen overdose in a dog. In these 2 cases, the intrinsic clearances of the patients were shown to be equivalent to that of standard hemodialysis alone, indicating that hemodialysis does not produce any advantage in carprofen clearance. In this limited report, we suggest that the efficacy of hemoperfusion in removing carprofen is short-lived, and extending the treatment beyond the first hour does not produce any therapeutic benefit. In order to extend the efficacy of hemoperfusion, hourly replacement of the charcoal filter should be considered.

Abstract

Objective: To describe the efficacy of in-series hemoperfusion and hemodialysis in 2 dogs with carprofen overdose.
Case Summary: This report describes the treatment of 2 dogs following accidental carprofen overdoses who underwent a single in-series hemoperfusion and hemodialysis session. Serial serum carprofen concentrations were measured before, during, and after the session. The first patient’s session lasted 5 hours, with the largest decrease in serum carprofen concentrations occurring during the first hour of treatment. The carprofen clearance during the following 4 hours of treatment decreased substantially compared to the first hour and was not different from the patient’s intrinsic clearance of carprofen after the session was completed. Based on the findings from the first case, the second patient was treated with a 1 hour single hemoperfusion and hemodialysis session. Our results support the hypothesis that carprofen is not effectively removed by conventional hemodialysis and the efficacy of hemoperfusion is short lived due to rapid saturation of the charcoal filter. Once filter saturation occurs, the extracorporeal session is no longer efficacious. Using in-series hemoperfusion and hemodialysis is of benefit to correct the side effects seen with hemoperfusion alone, and hourly charcoal filter replacementmay extend the efficacy of treatment in removing carprofen.
New or Unique Information Provided: This is the first published report of in-series hemoperfusion and hemodialysis being used to treat carprofen overdose in a dog. In these 2 cases, the intrinsic clearances of the patients were shown to be equivalent to that of standard hemodialysis alone, indicating that hemodialysis does not produce any advantage in carprofen clearance. In this limited report, we suggest that the efficacy of hemoperfusion in removing carprofen is short-lived, and extending the treatment beyond the first hour does not produce any therapeutic benefit. In order to extend the efficacy of hemoperfusion, hourly replacement of the charcoal filter should be considered.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > General Veterinary
Uncontrolled Keywords:General Veterinary
Language:English
Date:1 March 2020
Deposited On:16 Feb 2021 17:21
Last Modified:17 Feb 2021 21:01
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1476-4431
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/vec.12931

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