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Temperatures beyond the community optimum promote the dominance of heat-adapted, fast growing and stress resistant bacteria in alpine soils


Donhauser, Johanna; Niklaus, Pascal A; Rousk, Johannes; Larose, Catherine; Frey, Beat (2020). Temperatures beyond the community optimum promote the dominance of heat-adapted, fast growing and stress resistant bacteria in alpine soils. Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 148:107873.

Abstract

Alpine soils are warming strongly, leading to profound alterations in carbon cycling and greenhouse gas budgets, mediated via the soil microbiome. To explore microbial responses to global warming, we incubated eight alpine soils between 4 and 35 °C and linked the temperature dependency of bacterial growth with alterations in community structures and the identification of temperature sensitive taxa. The temperature optimum for bacterial growth was between 27 and 30 °C and was higher in soils from warmer environments. This temperature framing the upper limit of naturally occurring temperatures was a tipping point above which the temperature range for growth shifted towards higher temperatures together with pronounced changes in community structures and diversity based on both 16S rRNA gene and transcript sequencing. For instance, at the highest temperature, we observed a strong increase in OTUs affiliated with Burkholderia-Paraburkholderia, Phenylobacterium, Pseudolabrys, Edaphobacter and Sphingomonas. Dominance at high temperature was explained by a priori adaptation to high temperature, high growth potential as well as stress resistance. At the highest temperature, we moreover observed an overall increase in copiotrophic properties in the community along with high growth rates. Further, temperature effects on community structures depended on the long-term climatic legacy of the soils. These findings contribute to extrapolating from single to multiple sites across a large range of conditions.

Abstract

Alpine soils are warming strongly, leading to profound alterations in carbon cycling and greenhouse gas budgets, mediated via the soil microbiome. To explore microbial responses to global warming, we incubated eight alpine soils between 4 and 35 °C and linked the temperature dependency of bacterial growth with alterations in community structures and the identification of temperature sensitive taxa. The temperature optimum for bacterial growth was between 27 and 30 °C and was higher in soils from warmer environments. This temperature framing the upper limit of naturally occurring temperatures was a tipping point above which the temperature range for growth shifted towards higher temperatures together with pronounced changes in community structures and diversity based on both 16S rRNA gene and transcript sequencing. For instance, at the highest temperature, we observed a strong increase in OTUs affiliated with Burkholderia-Paraburkholderia, Phenylobacterium, Pseudolabrys, Edaphobacter and Sphingomonas. Dominance at high temperature was explained by a priori adaptation to high temperature, high growth potential as well as stress resistance. At the highest temperature, we moreover observed an overall increase in copiotrophic properties in the community along with high growth rates. Further, temperature effects on community structures depended on the long-term climatic legacy of the soils. These findings contribute to extrapolating from single to multiple sites across a large range of conditions.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Microbiology
Life Sciences > Soil Science
Uncontrolled Keywords:Soil Science, Microbiology
Language:English
Date:1 September 2020
Deposited On:16 Feb 2021 13:18
Last Modified:17 Feb 2021 21:01
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0038-0717
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2020.107873
Project Information:
  • : FunderH2020
  • : Grant ID675546
  • : Project TitleMicroArctic - Microorganisms in Warming Arctic Environments

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