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Systemic Inflammation, Vascular Function, and Endothelial Progenitor Cells after an Exercise Training Intervention in COPD


Neunhäuserer, Daniel; Patti, Alessandro; Niederseer, David; Kaiser, Bernhard; Cadamuro, Janne; Lamprecht, Bernd; Ermolao, Andrea; Studnicka, Michael; Niebauer, Josef (2021). Systemic Inflammation, Vascular Function, and Endothelial Progenitor Cells after an Exercise Training Intervention in COPD. American Journal of Medicine, 134(3):e171-e180.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Exercise training is a cornerstone of the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in all disease stages. Data about the training effects with supplemental oxygen in nonhypoxemic patients remains inconclusive. In this study we set out to investigate the training and oxygen effects on inflammatory markers, vascular function, and endothelial progenitor cells in this population of increased cardiovascular risk.

METHODS

In this prospective, randomized, double-blind, crossover study, 29 patients with nonhypoxemic COPD performed combined endurance and strength training 3 times a week while breathing medical air or supplemental oxygen for the first 6-week period, and were then reallocated to the opposite gas for the following 6 weeks. Exercise capacity, inflammatory biomarkers, endothelial function (peripheral arterial tone analysis), and endothelial progenitor cells were assessed. Data were also analyzed for a subgroup with endothelial dysfunction (reactive hyperemia index <1.67).

RESULTS

Following 12 weeks of exercise training, patients demonstrated a significant improvement of peak work rate and an associated decrease of blood fibrinogen and leptin. Eosinophils were found significantly reduced after exercise training in patients with endothelial dysfunction. In this subgroup, peripheral arterial tone analysis revealed a significant improvement of reactive hyperemia index. Generally, late endothelial progenitor cells were found significantly reduced after the exercise training intervention. Supplemental oxygen during training positively influenced the effect on exercise capacity without impact on inflammation and endothelial function.

CONCLUSIONS

This is the first randomized controlled trial in patients with COPD to show beneficial effects of exercise training not only on exercise capacity, but also on systemic/eosinophilic inflammation and endothelial dysfunction.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Exercise training is a cornerstone of the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in all disease stages. Data about the training effects with supplemental oxygen in nonhypoxemic patients remains inconclusive. In this study we set out to investigate the training and oxygen effects on inflammatory markers, vascular function, and endothelial progenitor cells in this population of increased cardiovascular risk.

METHODS

In this prospective, randomized, double-blind, crossover study, 29 patients with nonhypoxemic COPD performed combined endurance and strength training 3 times a week while breathing medical air or supplemental oxygen for the first 6-week period, and were then reallocated to the opposite gas for the following 6 weeks. Exercise capacity, inflammatory biomarkers, endothelial function (peripheral arterial tone analysis), and endothelial progenitor cells were assessed. Data were also analyzed for a subgroup with endothelial dysfunction (reactive hyperemia index <1.67).

RESULTS

Following 12 weeks of exercise training, patients demonstrated a significant improvement of peak work rate and an associated decrease of blood fibrinogen and leptin. Eosinophils were found significantly reduced after exercise training in patients with endothelial dysfunction. In this subgroup, peripheral arterial tone analysis revealed a significant improvement of reactive hyperemia index. Generally, late endothelial progenitor cells were found significantly reduced after the exercise training intervention. Supplemental oxygen during training positively influenced the effect on exercise capacity without impact on inflammation and endothelial function.

CONCLUSIONS

This is the first randomized controlled trial in patients with COPD to show beneficial effects of exercise training not only on exercise capacity, but also on systemic/eosinophilic inflammation and endothelial dysfunction.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > General Medicine
Language:English
Date:1 March 2021
Deposited On:16 Feb 2021 16:34
Last Modified:24 Feb 2021 02:30
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0002-9343
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjmed.2020.07.004
PubMed ID:32781050

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