Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Effects of active commuting on health-related quality of life and sickness-related absence


Neumeier, Luis M; Loidl, Martin; Reich, Bernhard; Fernandez La Puente de Battre, Maria Dolores; Kissel, Christine K; Templin, Christian; Schmied, Christian; Niebauer, Josef; Niederseer, David (2020). Effects of active commuting on health-related quality of life and sickness-related absence. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, 30(Suppl):31-40.

Abstract

Increased physical activity is associated with numerous health benefits. This study investigated the effect of active commuting (walking and cycling to work) on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and absence days from work due to sickness in healthy working adults. In total, 73 participants (age: 46 ± 9 years), all working at a tertiary university hospital in Salzburg, Austria, were randomized into an intervention group (IG, n = 51) and a control group (CG, n = 22). The IG was asked to commute actively for twelve months, whereas the CG did not have to change their usual commuting behavior. IG was divided into two subgroups: IG-C (cycling, n = 26) was asked to commute by bicycle and IG-PT (public transport, n = 25) partially using public transportation and walked the remaining distance to work. Significant positive changes in IG were observed in four subcomponents of the SF-36 (physical functioning (95 [10] to 100 [8.8], P = .023), mental health (82 [15] to 86 [15], P = .036), vitality (65 [20] to 70 [14], P = .005), and general health (70 [19] to 80 [24], P = .004)) as well as the physical component summary score (56.5 [9] to 59.2 [6.3], P = .002). IG-C showed greater and more statistically significant changes regarding HRQoL compared to IG-PT. Associations between active commuting and sick-leave days were only observed in IG-PT (7.5 [14.8] to 4.0 [11.3] days, P = .038). In conclusion, active commuting improves various components of HRQoL and might therefore be a possible strategy to increase quality of life in the workforce.

Abstract

Increased physical activity is associated with numerous health benefits. This study investigated the effect of active commuting (walking and cycling to work) on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and absence days from work due to sickness in healthy working adults. In total, 73 participants (age: 46 ± 9 years), all working at a tertiary university hospital in Salzburg, Austria, were randomized into an intervention group (IG, n = 51) and a control group (CG, n = 22). The IG was asked to commute actively for twelve months, whereas the CG did not have to change their usual commuting behavior. IG was divided into two subgroups: IG-C (cycling, n = 26) was asked to commute by bicycle and IG-PT (public transport, n = 25) partially using public transportation and walked the remaining distance to work. Significant positive changes in IG were observed in four subcomponents of the SF-36 (physical functioning (95 [10] to 100 [8.8], P = .023), mental health (82 [15] to 86 [15], P = .036), vitality (65 [20] to 70 [14], P = .005), and general health (70 [19] to 80 [24], P = .004)) as well as the physical component summary score (56.5 [9] to 59.2 [6.3], P = .002). IG-C showed greater and more statistically significant changes regarding HRQoL compared to IG-PT. Associations between active commuting and sick-leave days were only observed in IG-PT (7.5 [14.8] to 4.0 [11.3] days, P = .038). In conclusion, active commuting improves various components of HRQoL and might therefore be a possible strategy to increase quality of life in the workforce.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
3 citations in Web of Science®
3 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
Health Sciences > Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
Language:English
Date:August 2020
Deposited On:16 Feb 2021 17:28
Last Modified:17 Feb 2021 21:01
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0905-7188
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/sms.13667
PubMed ID:32246792

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

Get full-text in a library