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Modelling of three-dimensional, diurnal light extinction in two contrasting forests


Kükenbrink, Daniel; Schneider, Fabian D; Schmid, Bernhard; Gastellu-Etchegorry, Jean-Philippe; Schaepman, Michael E; Morsdorf, Felix (2021). Modelling of three-dimensional, diurnal light extinction in two contrasting forests. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, 296:108230.

Abstract

The three-dimensional (3D) distribution of light within forest ecosystems is a major driver for species competition, coexistence, forest ecosystem functioning, productivity, and diversity. However, accurate knowledge about the 3D distribution of light within the canopy is difficult to obtain. Recent advances in 3D forest reconstruction as well as the use of radiative transfer modelling provide new insights into spatio-temporal variations of light distribution within a forest canopy.

We used high resolution laser scanning data coupled with in-situ leaf optical properties (LOP) measurements to parameterize the DART radiative transfer model for a temperate deciduous forest on the Laegern mountain, Switzerland, and for a tropical rain forest located in the Lambir Hills national park, Borneo, Malaysia. Combining terrestrial and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) laser scanning acquisitions allowed a high detailed, 3D reconstruction of forest canopies.

We analyse the impact of the two contrasting forest canopies, both in terms of structure as well as optical properties, on the 3D extinction of photosynthetic active radiation (PAR, 400 nm - 700 nm) for a whole diurnal cycle. We show that PAR extinction is mainly driven by the canopy structure, resulting in an exponential light extinction profile for the temperate and a more linear extinction profile in the tropical site. The larger 3D heterogeneity in canopy structure for the tropical site also resulted in larger variability in light extinction throughout the whole canopy. We found that contrasting LOPs between the two forests had a minor influence on light extinction. However, approximating light extinction profiles with layered Beer-Lambert or Big-Leaf models only poorly represented the 3D heterogeneity of light extinction within the canopy, illustrating the need for more detailed 3D modelling of light distribution within forest ecosystems. This can give us important insights into light-related mechanisms driving species coexistence, competition and diversity in complex forest ecosystems.

Abstract

The three-dimensional (3D) distribution of light within forest ecosystems is a major driver for species competition, coexistence, forest ecosystem functioning, productivity, and diversity. However, accurate knowledge about the 3D distribution of light within the canopy is difficult to obtain. Recent advances in 3D forest reconstruction as well as the use of radiative transfer modelling provide new insights into spatio-temporal variations of light distribution within a forest canopy.

We used high resolution laser scanning data coupled with in-situ leaf optical properties (LOP) measurements to parameterize the DART radiative transfer model for a temperate deciduous forest on the Laegern mountain, Switzerland, and for a tropical rain forest located in the Lambir Hills national park, Borneo, Malaysia. Combining terrestrial and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) laser scanning acquisitions allowed a high detailed, 3D reconstruction of forest canopies.

We analyse the impact of the two contrasting forest canopies, both in terms of structure as well as optical properties, on the 3D extinction of photosynthetic active radiation (PAR, 400 nm - 700 nm) for a whole diurnal cycle. We show that PAR extinction is mainly driven by the canopy structure, resulting in an exponential light extinction profile for the temperate and a more linear extinction profile in the tropical site. The larger 3D heterogeneity in canopy structure for the tropical site also resulted in larger variability in light extinction throughout the whole canopy. We found that contrasting LOPs between the two forests had a minor influence on light extinction. However, approximating light extinction profiles with layered Beer-Lambert or Big-Leaf models only poorly represented the 3D heterogeneity of light extinction within the canopy, illustrating the need for more detailed 3D modelling of light distribution within forest ecosystems. This can give us important insights into light-related mechanisms driving species coexistence, competition and diversity in complex forest ecosystems.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Forestry
Physical Sciences > Global and Planetary Change
Life Sciences > Agronomy and Crop Science
Physical Sciences > Atmospheric Science
Uncontrolled Keywords:Agronomy and Crop Science, Forestry, Atmospheric Science, Global and Planetary Change
Language:English
Date:1 January 2021
Deposited On:16 Feb 2021 08:43
Last Modified:17 Feb 2021 21:02
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0168-1923
OA Status:Hybrid
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.agrformet.2020.108230

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