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Beyond general resistance training. Hypertrophy versus muscular endurance training as therapeutic interventions in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus: A systematic review and meta-analysis


Acosta-Manzano, Pedro; Rodriguez-Ayllon, María; Acosta, Francisco M; Niederseer, David; Niebauer, Josef (2020). Beyond general resistance training. Hypertrophy versus muscular endurance training as therapeutic interventions in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Obesity Reviews, 21(6):e13007.

Abstract

Resistance training (RT) is a powerful first-line intervention for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Nonetheless, the effects of the most frequent RT (hypertrophy training [HT] and muscular endurance training [MERT]) employed for the management of T2DM, and which type of RT might exert superior effects, remain elusive. Thus, this review aims to assess the effects of HT and MERT on glycaemic control, physical fitness, body composition, lipid profile, blood pressure, C-reactive protein, and quality of life in patients with T2DM; to analyse which particular RT is more effective; to assess the effects of general RT; and to identify RT components, characteristics of patients, and medications that could mediate the effects of RT. Randomized controlled trials (RCT) and non-RCT (RT≥ 4 weeks) in adults with T2DM were selected. Both HT and MERT improved HbA1c, insulin levels and sensitivity, muscle strength, body mass index, waist circumference, and fat mass. Additionally, HT improved glucose, cardiorespiratory fitness, fat percentage, lean body mass, lipid profile, systolic blood pressure, and C-reactive protein, and MERT improved weight. Overall, HT and MERT exert beneficial effects well comparable with aerobic training. Both types of RT can be used as potent therapeutic interventions for the management of T2DM depending on patients' limitations/preferences.

Abstract

Resistance training (RT) is a powerful first-line intervention for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Nonetheless, the effects of the most frequent RT (hypertrophy training [HT] and muscular endurance training [MERT]) employed for the management of T2DM, and which type of RT might exert superior effects, remain elusive. Thus, this review aims to assess the effects of HT and MERT on glycaemic control, physical fitness, body composition, lipid profile, blood pressure, C-reactive protein, and quality of life in patients with T2DM; to analyse which particular RT is more effective; to assess the effects of general RT; and to identify RT components, characteristics of patients, and medications that could mediate the effects of RT. Randomized controlled trials (RCT) and non-RCT (RT≥ 4 weeks) in adults with T2DM were selected. Both HT and MERT improved HbA1c, insulin levels and sensitivity, muscle strength, body mass index, waist circumference, and fat mass. Additionally, HT improved glucose, cardiorespiratory fitness, fat percentage, lean body mass, lipid profile, systolic blood pressure, and C-reactive protein, and MERT improved weight. Overall, HT and MERT exert beneficial effects well comparable with aerobic training. Both types of RT can be used as potent therapeutic interventions for the management of T2DM depending on patients' limitations/preferences.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
Health Sciences > Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
Language:English
Date:June 2020
Deposited On:17 Feb 2021 07:09
Last Modified:18 Feb 2021 21:00
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1467-7881
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/obr.13007
PubMed ID:32067343

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