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A chronic high phosphate intake in mice is detrimental for bone health without major renal alterations


Ugrica, Marko; Bettoni, Carla; Bourgeois, Soline; Daryadel, Arezoo; Pastor-Arroyo, Eva-Maria; Gehring, Nicole; Hernando, Nati; Wagner, Carsten A; Rubio-Aliaga, Isabel (2021). A chronic high phosphate intake in mice is detrimental for bone health without major renal alterations. Nephrology, Dialysis, Transplantation, 36(7):1183-1191.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Phosphate intake has increased in the last decades due to a higher consumption of processed foods. This higher intake is detrimental for patients with chronic kidney disease, increasing mortality and cardiovascular disease risk and accelerating kidney dysfunction. Whether a chronic high phosphate diet is also detrimental for the healthy population is still under debate.

METHODS

We fed healthy mature adult mice over a period of one year with either a high (1.2% w/w) or a standard (0.6% w/w) phosphate diet, and investigated the impact of a high phosphate diet on mineral homeostasis, kidney function and bone health.

RESULTS

The high phosphate diet increased plasma phosphate, parathyroid hormone (PTH) and calcitriol levels, with no change in fibroblast growth factor 23 levels. Urinary phosphate, calcium and ammonium excretion were increased. Measured glomerular filtration rate was apparently unaffected, while blood urea was lower and urea clearance was higher in animals fed the high phosphate diet. No change was observed in plasma creatinine levels. Blood and urinary pH were more acidic paralleled by higher bone resorption observed in animals fed a high phosphate diet. Total and cortical bone mineral density was lower in animals fed a high phosphate diet and this effect is independent of the higher PTH levels observed.

CONCLUSIONS

A chronic high phosphate intake did not cause major renal alterations, but affected negatively bone health, increasing bone resorption and decreasing bone mineral density.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Phosphate intake has increased in the last decades due to a higher consumption of processed foods. This higher intake is detrimental for patients with chronic kidney disease, increasing mortality and cardiovascular disease risk and accelerating kidney dysfunction. Whether a chronic high phosphate diet is also detrimental for the healthy population is still under debate.

METHODS

We fed healthy mature adult mice over a period of one year with either a high (1.2% w/w) or a standard (0.6% w/w) phosphate diet, and investigated the impact of a high phosphate diet on mineral homeostasis, kidney function and bone health.

RESULTS

The high phosphate diet increased plasma phosphate, parathyroid hormone (PTH) and calcitriol levels, with no change in fibroblast growth factor 23 levels. Urinary phosphate, calcium and ammonium excretion were increased. Measured glomerular filtration rate was apparently unaffected, while blood urea was lower and urea clearance was higher in animals fed the high phosphate diet. No change was observed in plasma creatinine levels. Blood and urinary pH were more acidic paralleled by higher bone resorption observed in animals fed a high phosphate diet. Total and cortical bone mineral density was lower in animals fed a high phosphate diet and this effect is independent of the higher PTH levels observed.

CONCLUSIONS

A chronic high phosphate intake did not cause major renal alterations, but affected negatively bone health, increasing bone resorption and decreasing bone mineral density.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:28 June 2021
Deposited On:19 Feb 2021 16:28
Last Modified:29 Jun 2021 01:06
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0931-0509
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/ndt/gfab015
PubMed ID:33515264

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Embargo till: 2022-02-01