Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Temporal biodiversity change following disturbance varies along an environmental gradient


Kaarlejärvi, Elina; Salemaa, Maija; Tonteri, Tiina; Merilä, Päivi; Laine, Anna‐Liisa (2021). Temporal biodiversity change following disturbance varies along an environmental gradient. Global Ecology and Biogeography, 30(2):476-489.

Abstract

Aim

The diversity and composition of natural communities are rapidly changing due to anthropogenic disturbances. Magnitude of this compositional reorganization varies across the globe, but reasons behind the variation remain largely unknown. Disturbances induce temporal turnover by stimulating species colonizations, causing local extinctions, altering dominance structure, or all of these. We test which of these processes drive temporal community changes, and whether they are constrained by natural environmental gradients. Moreover, we assess to what degree identity shifts translate to changes in dominance structure.
Location

Finland.
Time period

Observations 1985–2006, disturbance history > 140 years.
Major taxa studied

Vascular plants.
Methods

We investigated temporal turnover of boreal forest understorey in response to disturbance, here forest management, along a soil fertility gradient. We disentangle the roles of species gains, losses and abundance changes in driving temporal turnover in response to and after disturbance by comparing turnover rates in different forest age categories along a fertility gradient. We quantify temporal turnover using richness‐based complement of Jaccard’s similarity index and proportional‐abundance based dissimilarity index. We also test whether disturbance history or fertility influence the relationship between identity shifts and dominance structure.
Results

We found that the impact of disturbance on temporal turnover depends on soil fertility. The greatest turnover occurred in the most fertile forests immediately after disturbance. There, species gains and losses strongly altered dominance structure leading to high turnover, whereas undisturbed old forests and nutrient‐poor habitats were characterized by stable dominant species even when the majority of species shifted their identity.
Main conclusions

Our results suggest that human impacts on temporal biodiversity change vary along environmental gradients. In boreal forests, the fertile habitats have a higher probability than nutrient‐poor sites of changing their composition in response to anthropogenic disturbances. Resource availability and disturbance history may thus influence consequences of temporal turnover for ecosystem functioning.

Abstract

Aim

The diversity and composition of natural communities are rapidly changing due to anthropogenic disturbances. Magnitude of this compositional reorganization varies across the globe, but reasons behind the variation remain largely unknown. Disturbances induce temporal turnover by stimulating species colonizations, causing local extinctions, altering dominance structure, or all of these. We test which of these processes drive temporal community changes, and whether they are constrained by natural environmental gradients. Moreover, we assess to what degree identity shifts translate to changes in dominance structure.
Location

Finland.
Time period

Observations 1985–2006, disturbance history > 140 years.
Major taxa studied

Vascular plants.
Methods

We investigated temporal turnover of boreal forest understorey in response to disturbance, here forest management, along a soil fertility gradient. We disentangle the roles of species gains, losses and abundance changes in driving temporal turnover in response to and after disturbance by comparing turnover rates in different forest age categories along a fertility gradient. We quantify temporal turnover using richness‐based complement of Jaccard’s similarity index and proportional‐abundance based dissimilarity index. We also test whether disturbance history or fertility influence the relationship between identity shifts and dominance structure.
Results

We found that the impact of disturbance on temporal turnover depends on soil fertility. The greatest turnover occurred in the most fertile forests immediately after disturbance. There, species gains and losses strongly altered dominance structure leading to high turnover, whereas undisturbed old forests and nutrient‐poor habitats were characterized by stable dominant species even when the majority of species shifted their identity.
Main conclusions

Our results suggest that human impacts on temporal biodiversity change vary along environmental gradients. In boreal forests, the fertile habitats have a higher probability than nutrient‐poor sites of changing their composition in response to anthropogenic disturbances. Resource availability and disturbance history may thus influence consequences of temporal turnover for ecosystem functioning.

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Downloads

2 downloads since deposited on 19 Feb 2021
2 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Scopus Subject Areas:Physical Sciences > Global and Planetary Change
Life Sciences > Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
Physical Sciences > Ecology
Uncontrolled Keywords:Ecology, Global and Planetary Change, Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
Language:English
Date:1 February 2021
Deposited On:19 Feb 2021 16:11
Last Modified:20 Feb 2021 21:00
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1466-822X
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/geb.13233

Download

Hybrid Open Access

Download PDF  'Temporal biodiversity change following disturbance varies along an environmental gradient'.
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 923kB
View at publisher
Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0)