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Vegetation Trajectories and Shortwave Radiative Forcing Following Boreal Forest Disturbance in Eastern Siberia


Stuenzi, S M; Schaepman-Strub, G (2020). Vegetation Trajectories and Shortwave Radiative Forcing Following Boreal Forest Disturbance in Eastern Siberia. Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences, 125(6):e2019JG005395.

Abstract

Major boreal forest disturbance and associated carbon emissions have been reported in the coldest region of the Northern Hemisphere. Related biophysical feedbacks to climate remain highly uncertain but might reduce warming effects expected from carbon emissions. This study quantifies albedo change after disturbance, primarily fires, in larch‐dominated forests around Yakutsk as compared to undisturbed areas with natural albedo variability, using satellite‐based time series. The related annual mean shortwave radiative forcing was −6.015 W/m2 for the 13 years following forest disturbance. It was highly negative during snow‐covered months (−3.738 to −13.638 W/m2), but positive (+5.441 W/m2) for the summer months in the first year after disturbance, decreasing afterward and also turning into a negative forcing after 5 years. Forcing by surface shortwave radiation must be considered to assess the impact of boreal forest disturbance on climate and additional feedbacks, such as increased permafrost thaw or transition to alternative ecosystem states.

Abstract

Major boreal forest disturbance and associated carbon emissions have been reported in the coldest region of the Northern Hemisphere. Related biophysical feedbacks to climate remain highly uncertain but might reduce warming effects expected from carbon emissions. This study quantifies albedo change after disturbance, primarily fires, in larch‐dominated forests around Yakutsk as compared to undisturbed areas with natural albedo variability, using satellite‐based time series. The related annual mean shortwave radiative forcing was −6.015 W/m2 for the 13 years following forest disturbance. It was highly negative during snow‐covered months (−3.738 to −13.638 W/m2), but positive (+5.441 W/m2) for the summer months in the first year after disturbance, decreasing afterward and also turning into a negative forcing after 5 years. Forcing by surface shortwave radiation must be considered to assess the impact of boreal forest disturbance on climate and additional feedbacks, such as increased permafrost thaw or transition to alternative ecosystem states.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
08 Research Priority Programs > Global Change and Biodiversity
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Scopus Subject Areas:Physical Sciences > Geophysics
Life Sciences > Forestry
Physical Sciences > Oceanography
Life Sciences > Aquatic Science
Physical Sciences > Ecology
Physical Sciences > Water Science and Technology
Life Sciences > Soil Science
Physical Sciences > Geochemistry and Petrology
Physical Sciences > Earth-Surface Processes
Physical Sciences > Atmospheric Science
Physical Sciences > Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
Physical Sciences > Space and Planetary Science
Physical Sciences > Paleontology
Language:English
Date:1 June 2020
Deposited On:19 Feb 2021 15:43
Last Modified:20 Feb 2021 21:00
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:2169-8953
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1029/2019jg005395

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