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Magnetic resonance imaging in multiple sclerosis animal models: A systematic review, meta-analysis, and white paper


Ineichen, Benjamin V; Sati, Pascal; Granberg, Tobias; Absinta, Martina; Lee, Nathanael J; Lefeuvre, Jennifer A; Reich, Daniel S (2020). Magnetic resonance imaging in multiple sclerosis animal models: A systematic review, meta-analysis, and white paper. NeuroImage: Clinical, 28:102371.

Abstract

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most important paraclinical tool for assessing drug response in multiple sclerosis (MS) clinical trials. As such, MRI has also been widely used in preclinical research to investigate drug efficacy and pathogenic aspects in MS animal models. Keeping track of all published preclinical imaging studies, and possible new therapeutic approaches, has become difficult considering the abundance of studies. Moreover, comparisons between studies are hampered by methodological differences, especially since small differences in an MRI protocol can lead to large differences in tissue contrast. We therefore provide a comprehensive qualitative overview of preclinical MRI studies in the field of neuroinflammatory and demyelinating diseases, aiming to summarize experimental setup, MRI methodology, and risk of bias. We also provide estimates of the effects of tested therapeutic interventions by a meta-analysis. Finally, to improve the standardization of preclinical experiments, we propose guidelines on technical aspects of MRI and reporting that can serve as a framework for future preclinical studies using MRI in MS animal models. By implementing these guidelines, clinical translation of findings will be facilitated, and could possibly reduce experimental animal numbers.

Abstract

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most important paraclinical tool for assessing drug response in multiple sclerosis (MS) clinical trials. As such, MRI has also been widely used in preclinical research to investigate drug efficacy and pathogenic aspects in MS animal models. Keeping track of all published preclinical imaging studies, and possible new therapeutic approaches, has become difficult considering the abundance of studies. Moreover, comparisons between studies are hampered by methodological differences, especially since small differences in an MRI protocol can lead to large differences in tissue contrast. We therefore provide a comprehensive qualitative overview of preclinical MRI studies in the field of neuroinflammatory and demyelinating diseases, aiming to summarize experimental setup, MRI methodology, and risk of bias. We also provide estimates of the effects of tested therapeutic interventions by a meta-analysis. Finally, to improve the standardization of preclinical experiments, we propose guidelines on technical aspects of MRI and reporting that can serve as a framework for future preclinical studies using MRI in MS animal models. By implementing these guidelines, clinical translation of findings will be facilitated, and could possibly reduce experimental animal numbers.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neuroradiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Imaging
Life Sciences > Neurology
Health Sciences > Neurology (clinical)
Life Sciences > Cognitive Neuroscience
Uncontrolled Keywords:Cognitive Neuroscience, Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging, Neurology, Clinical Neurology
Language:English
Date:1 January 2020
Deposited On:26 Mar 2021 12:14
Last Modified:25 May 2024 01:49
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:2213-1582
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nicl.2020.102371
PubMed ID:32818883
  • Content: Published Version
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)