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Neural competition between concurrent speech production and other speech perception


Dietziker, Joris; Staib, Matthias; Frühholz, Sascha (2021). Neural competition between concurrent speech production and other speech perception. NeuroImage, 228:117710.

Abstract

Understanding others’ speech while individuals simultaneously produce speech utterances implies neural competition and requires specific mechanisms for a neural resolution given that previous studies proposed opposing signal dynamics for both processes in the auditory cortex (AC). We here used neuroimaging in humans to investigate this neural competition by lateralized stimulations with other speech samples and ipsilateral or contralateral lateralized feedback of actively produced self speech utterances in the form of various speech vowels. In experiment 1, we show, first, that others’ speech classifications during active self speech lead to activity in the planum temporale (PTe) when both self and other speech samples were presented together to only the left or right ear. The contralateral PTe also seemed to indifferently respond to single self and other speech samples. Second, specific activity in the left anterior superior temporal cortex (STC) was found during dichotic stimulations (i.e. self and other speech presented to separate ears). Unlike previous studies, this left anterior STC activity supported self speech rather than other speech processing. Furthermore, right mid and anterior STC was more involved in other speech processing. These results signify specific mechanisms for self and other speech processing in the left and right STC beyond a more general speech processing in PTe. Third, other speech recognition in the context of listening to recorded self speech in experiment 2 led to largely symmetric activity in STC and additionally in inferior frontal subregions. The latter was previously reported to be generally relevant for other speech perception and classification, but we found frontal activity only when other speech classification was challenged by recorded but not by active self speech samples. Altogether, unlike formerly established brain networks for uncompetitive other speech perception, active self speech during other speech perception seemingly leads to a neural reordering, functional reassignment, and unusual lateralization of AC and frontal brain activations.

Abstract

Understanding others’ speech while individuals simultaneously produce speech utterances implies neural competition and requires specific mechanisms for a neural resolution given that previous studies proposed opposing signal dynamics for both processes in the auditory cortex (AC). We here used neuroimaging in humans to investigate this neural competition by lateralized stimulations with other speech samples and ipsilateral or contralateral lateralized feedback of actively produced self speech utterances in the form of various speech vowels. In experiment 1, we show, first, that others’ speech classifications during active self speech lead to activity in the planum temporale (PTe) when both self and other speech samples were presented together to only the left or right ear. The contralateral PTe also seemed to indifferently respond to single self and other speech samples. Second, specific activity in the left anterior superior temporal cortex (STC) was found during dichotic stimulations (i.e. self and other speech presented to separate ears). Unlike previous studies, this left anterior STC activity supported self speech rather than other speech processing. Furthermore, right mid and anterior STC was more involved in other speech processing. These results signify specific mechanisms for self and other speech processing in the left and right STC beyond a more general speech processing in PTe. Third, other speech recognition in the context of listening to recorded self speech in experiment 2 led to largely symmetric activity in STC and additionally in inferior frontal subregions. The latter was previously reported to be generally relevant for other speech perception and classification, but we found frontal activity only when other speech classification was challenged by recorded but not by active self speech samples. Altogether, unlike formerly established brain networks for uncompetitive other speech perception, active self speech during other speech perception seemingly leads to a neural reordering, functional reassignment, and unusual lateralization of AC and frontal brain activations.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Neuroscience Center Zurich
Special Collections > Centers of Competence > Center for the Interdisciplinary Study of Language Evolution
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Neurology
Life Sciences > Cognitive Neuroscience
Uncontrolled Keywords:Cognitive Neuroscience, Neurology
Language:English
Date:1 March 2021
Deposited On:12 Mar 2021 12:40
Last Modified:25 Apr 2024 01:35
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1053-8119
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2020.117710
PubMed ID:33385557
  • Content: Published Version
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)