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Banking Progenitor Cells for Hippiatric Regenerative Medicine: Optimized Establishment of Safe and Consistent Cell Sources for Standardized Veterinary Therapeutic Protocols


Laurent, Alexis; Darwiche, Salim E; Hirt-Burri, Nathalie; Scaletta, Corinne; Michetti, Murielle; Laurent, Philippe; Raffoul, Wassim; de Buys Roessingh, Anthony S; Applegate, Lee Ann (2020). Banking Progenitor Cells for Hippiatric Regenerative Medicine: Optimized Establishment of Safe and Consistent Cell Sources for Standardized Veterinary Therapeutic Protocols. American Journal of Biomedical Science, 8(4):252-271.

Abstract

Acute musculoskeletal injuries in large animals such as horses or camels often result in productivity losses and euthanasia in racing, esthetic or stock animal industries. Bioengineered products for tissue reconstruction and wound healing may supplement traditional veterinary surgical care synergistically. Banked primary fetal progenitor cells can potentially be used towards structural and functional therapeutic restoration in condensed timeframes. Extensive clinical experience exists in our University Hospital working with dermal progenitor fibroblasts for managing burns, donor site grafts and ulcers. By extrapolation, the present study assessed suitability of equine fetal progenitor cell sources for biotechnological processing, robust cell banking and application in tissue engineering strategies for hippiatric regenerative medicine. Diverse fetal equine musculoskeletal tissues were obtained and processed under defined frameworks and protocols for standardized and optimized tiered cell bank establishment and characterization. Consistency, safety and cyto-compatibility of progeny cells with therapeutic delivery systems were assessed. Finally, optimized hippiatric cell therapy protocols were applied for preliminary safety assessments and promoting musculoskeletal wound healing in four equine subjects. Equine progenitor cells were found to optimally adapt to standardized biotechnological processing, rapid extensive cell banking and consistent therapeutic construct bioengineering. Clinical applications of equine allogeneic cell therapies in large animals yielded preliminary evidence of safety and facilitated volumetric defect reconstruction or wound healing. Gathered experience around veterinary wound management using progenitor cells proved highly similar to therapeutic care of human patients suffering acute and chronic musculoskeletal affections. Standardized processing of a single organ donation and establishment of dedicated equine cell banks allows consistent and off-the-freezer allogeneic treatments to potentially be made available for millions of veterinary patients. Prior art in human translational regenerative medicine and preliminary evidence in veterinary settings strongly support the candidacy of equine progenitor cell banking as an optimal tool for efficient therapeutic management of diverse hippiatric musculoskeletal affections.

Abstract

Acute musculoskeletal injuries in large animals such as horses or camels often result in productivity losses and euthanasia in racing, esthetic or stock animal industries. Bioengineered products for tissue reconstruction and wound healing may supplement traditional veterinary surgical care synergistically. Banked primary fetal progenitor cells can potentially be used towards structural and functional therapeutic restoration in condensed timeframes. Extensive clinical experience exists in our University Hospital working with dermal progenitor fibroblasts for managing burns, donor site grafts and ulcers. By extrapolation, the present study assessed suitability of equine fetal progenitor cell sources for biotechnological processing, robust cell banking and application in tissue engineering strategies for hippiatric regenerative medicine. Diverse fetal equine musculoskeletal tissues were obtained and processed under defined frameworks and protocols for standardized and optimized tiered cell bank establishment and characterization. Consistency, safety and cyto-compatibility of progeny cells with therapeutic delivery systems were assessed. Finally, optimized hippiatric cell therapy protocols were applied for preliminary safety assessments and promoting musculoskeletal wound healing in four equine subjects. Equine progenitor cells were found to optimally adapt to standardized biotechnological processing, rapid extensive cell banking and consistent therapeutic construct bioengineering. Clinical applications of equine allogeneic cell therapies in large animals yielded preliminary evidence of safety and facilitated volumetric defect reconstruction or wound healing. Gathered experience around veterinary wound management using progenitor cells proved highly similar to therapeutic care of human patients suffering acute and chronic musculoskeletal affections. Standardized processing of a single organ donation and establishment of dedicated equine cell banks allows consistent and off-the-freezer allogeneic treatments to potentially be made available for millions of veterinary patients. Prior art in human translational regenerative medicine and preliminary evidence in veterinary settings strongly support the candidacy of equine progenitor cell banking as an optimal tool for efficient therapeutic management of diverse hippiatric musculoskeletal affections.

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Item Type:Journal Article, not_refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinärwissenschaftliches Institut > Department of Molecular Mechanisms of Disease
07 Faculty of Science > Department of Molecular Mechanisms of Disease
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:13 April 2020
Deposited On:23 Mar 2021 17:27
Last Modified:27 Jan 2022 06:11
Publisher:Biomedgrid
ISSN:2642-1747
OA Status:Green
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.34297/AJBSR.2020.08.001284
  • Content: Published Version
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)