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Comparing the network structure of ICD-11 PTSD and complex PTSD in three African countries


Levin, Yafit; Hyland, Philip; Karatzias, Thanos; Shevlin, Mark; Bachem, Rahel; Maercker, Andreas; Ben-Ezra, Menachem (2021). Comparing the network structure of ICD-11 PTSD and complex PTSD in three African countries. Journal of Psychiatric Research, 136:80-86.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Symptom network analysis has become an essential tool for researchers and clinicians investigating the structure of mental disorders. Two methods have been used; one relies on partial correlations, and the second relies on zero order correlations with forced-directed algorithm. This combination was used to examine symptom connections for ICD-11 Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Complex PTSD (CPTSD) as the symptoms for these disorders have been known to be organized in a multi-dimensional and hierarchical fashion. We aimed to examine whether networks of ICD-11 CPTSD symptoms reproduced across samples from three African countries.

METHODS

We produced network models based on data from 2524 participants in Nigeria (n = 1018), Kenya (n = 1006), and Ghana (n = 500). PTSD and CPTSD symptoms were measured using the International Trauma Questionnaire (Cloitre et al., 2018).

RESULTS

The CPTSD network analysis using force-directed method alongside partial correlations based on Gaussian Graphical Models (GGM) revealed the multidimensional-hierarchal structure of CPTSD. The within-cluster symptoms of Disturbances in Self Organization (DSO) and PTSD were strongly correlated with each other in all networks, and the cross-cluster symptoms were lower. The most central symptom was 'feelings of worthlessness', a symptom of Negative Self-Concept that is part of the CPTSD cluster. The networks were very similar across the three countries.

CONCLUSIONS

Findings support the ICD-11 model of PTSD and CPTSD in three African countries.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Symptom network analysis has become an essential tool for researchers and clinicians investigating the structure of mental disorders. Two methods have been used; one relies on partial correlations, and the second relies on zero order correlations with forced-directed algorithm. This combination was used to examine symptom connections for ICD-11 Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Complex PTSD (CPTSD) as the symptoms for these disorders have been known to be organized in a multi-dimensional and hierarchical fashion. We aimed to examine whether networks of ICD-11 CPTSD symptoms reproduced across samples from three African countries.

METHODS

We produced network models based on data from 2524 participants in Nigeria (n = 1018), Kenya (n = 1006), and Ghana (n = 500). PTSD and CPTSD symptoms were measured using the International Trauma Questionnaire (Cloitre et al., 2018).

RESULTS

The CPTSD network analysis using force-directed method alongside partial correlations based on Gaussian Graphical Models (GGM) revealed the multidimensional-hierarchal structure of CPTSD. The within-cluster symptoms of Disturbances in Self Organization (DSO) and PTSD were strongly correlated with each other in all networks, and the cross-cluster symptoms were lower. The most central symptom was 'feelings of worthlessness', a symptom of Negative Self-Concept that is part of the CPTSD cluster. The networks were very similar across the three countries.

CONCLUSIONS

Findings support the ICD-11 model of PTSD and CPTSD in three African countries.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Psychiatry and Mental Health
Life Sciences > Biological Psychiatry
Language:English
Date:25 January 2021
Deposited On:23 Mar 2021 12:52
Last Modified:25 Jun 2024 01:38
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0022-3956
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychires.2021.01.041
PubMed ID:33578110
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