Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Investigating Primary Cilia during Peripheral Nervous System Formation


Yusifov, Elkhan; Dumoulin, Alexandre; Stoeckli, Esther T (2021). Investigating Primary Cilia during Peripheral Nervous System Formation. International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 22(6):3176.

Abstract

The primary cilium plays a pivotal role during the embryonic development of vertebrates. It acts as a somatic signaling hub for specific pathways, such as Sonic Hedgehog signaling. In humans, mutations in genes that cause dysregulation of ciliogenesis or ciliary function lead to severe developmental disorders called ciliopathies. Beyond its role in early morphogenesis, growing evidence points towards an essential function of the primary cilium in neural circuit formation in the central nervous system. However, very little is known about a potential role in the formation of the peripheral nervous system. Here, we investigate the presence of the primary cilium in neural crest cells and their derivatives in the trunk of developing chicken embryos in vivo. We found that neural crest cells, sensory neurons, and boundary cap cells all bear a primary cilium during key stages of early peripheral nervous system formation. Moreover, we describe differences in the ciliation of neuronal cultures of different populations from the peripheral and central nervous systems. Our results offer a framework for further in vivo and in vitro investigations on specific roles that the primary cilium might play during peripheral nervous system formation.

Abstract

The primary cilium plays a pivotal role during the embryonic development of vertebrates. It acts as a somatic signaling hub for specific pathways, such as Sonic Hedgehog signaling. In humans, mutations in genes that cause dysregulation of ciliogenesis or ciliary function lead to severe developmental disorders called ciliopathies. Beyond its role in early morphogenesis, growing evidence points towards an essential function of the primary cilium in neural circuit formation in the central nervous system. However, very little is known about a potential role in the formation of the peripheral nervous system. Here, we investigate the presence of the primary cilium in neural crest cells and their derivatives in the trunk of developing chicken embryos in vivo. We found that neural crest cells, sensory neurons, and boundary cap cells all bear a primary cilium during key stages of early peripheral nervous system formation. Moreover, we describe differences in the ciliation of neuronal cultures of different populations from the peripheral and central nervous systems. Our results offer a framework for further in vivo and in vitro investigations on specific roles that the primary cilium might play during peripheral nervous system formation.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
5 citations in Web of Science®
4 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

70 downloads since deposited on 08 Apr 2021
12 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Molecular Life Sciences
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Scopus Subject Areas:Physical Sciences > Catalysis
Life Sciences > Molecular Biology
Physical Sciences > Spectroscopy
Physical Sciences > Computer Science Applications
Physical Sciences > Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
Physical Sciences > Organic Chemistry
Physical Sciences > Inorganic Chemistry
Uncontrolled Keywords:Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, Spectroscopy, Molecular Biology, Catalysis, General Medicine, Computer Science Applications
Language:English
Date:20 March 2021
Deposited On:08 Apr 2021 08:37
Last Modified:25 May 2024 01:51
Publisher:MDPI Publishing
ISSN:1422-0067
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22063176
  • Content: Published Version
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)