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Extending the Study of Gelotophobia, Gelotophilia, and Katagelasticism in Romantic Life Toward Romantic Attachment


Brauer, Kay; Proyer, René T; Ruch, Willibald (2020). Extending the Study of Gelotophobia, Gelotophilia, and Katagelasticism in Romantic Life Toward Romantic Attachment. Journal of Individual Differences, 41(2):86-100.

Abstract

Gelotophobia (fear of being laughed at), gelotophilia (joy in being laughed at), and katagelasticism (joy in laughing at others) describe individual differences in how people deal with ridicule and being laughed at. We study their association with romantic attachment styles and romantic outcomes in adults. Study 1 ( N = 247) shows that gelotophobia goes along with higher expressions in attachment anxiety and avoidance. This study also provides support for the notion that gelotophobes demonstrate a lower likelihood of entering romantic relationships (odds ratio = 0.62/0.64 for past/current relationship status). Gelotophilia goes along with lower avoidance and katagelasticism exists independently from romantic attachment. Study 2 replicates the findings in 154 heterosexual romantic couples using Actor–Partner Interdependence Model analyses. However, katagelasticism was related to greater attachment anxiety in this sample of couples. A mini-meta analysis using data from both studies ( N = 555) clarified this association and showed that the joy in laughing at others yields a small positive association with attachment anxiety. Further, attachment styles mediate associations between the dispositions and relationship satisfaction in the couples. Overall, the dispositions are distinctively related with romantic attachment styles and our findings contribute to the understanding of the role of dealing with ridicule and laughter in romantic life.

Abstract

Gelotophobia (fear of being laughed at), gelotophilia (joy in being laughed at), and katagelasticism (joy in laughing at others) describe individual differences in how people deal with ridicule and being laughed at. We study their association with romantic attachment styles and romantic outcomes in adults. Study 1 ( N = 247) shows that gelotophobia goes along with higher expressions in attachment anxiety and avoidance. This study also provides support for the notion that gelotophobes demonstrate a lower likelihood of entering romantic relationships (odds ratio = 0.62/0.64 for past/current relationship status). Gelotophilia goes along with lower avoidance and katagelasticism exists independently from romantic attachment. Study 2 replicates the findings in 154 heterosexual romantic couples using Actor–Partner Interdependence Model analyses. However, katagelasticism was related to greater attachment anxiety in this sample of couples. A mini-meta analysis using data from both studies ( N = 555) clarified this association and showed that the joy in laughing at others yields a small positive association with attachment anxiety. Further, attachment styles mediate associations between the dispositions and relationship satisfaction in the couples. Overall, the dispositions are distinctively related with romantic attachment styles and our findings contribute to the understanding of the role of dealing with ridicule and laughter in romantic life.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Scopus Subject Areas:Social Sciences & Humanities > General Psychology
Life Sciences > Biological Psychiatry
Uncontrolled Keywords:Biological Psychiatry, General Psychology
Language:English
Date:1 April 2020
Deposited On:29 Apr 2021 13:15
Last Modified:25 Jun 2024 01:39
Publisher:Hogrefe & Huber
ISSN:1614-0001
Additional Information:This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in "Journal of Individual Differences". It is not the version of record and is therefore not suitable for citation.
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1027/1614-0001/a000307
  • Content: Accepted Version