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Condition‐dependent interaction between mating success and competitive fertilization success in Drosophila melanogaster


De Nardo, Alessio N; Roy, Jeannine; Sbilordo, Sonja H; Lüpold, Stefan (2021). Condition‐dependent interaction between mating success and competitive fertilization success in Drosophila melanogaster. Evolution, 75(8):2014-2026.

Abstract

Dietary restriction during development can affect adult body size and condition. In many species, larger (high‐condition) males gain higher mating success through male‐male competition and female choice, and female condition can affect the extent of both female mate choice and male investment in courtship or ejaculates. However, few studies have examined the joint effects and interplay of male and female condition during both the pre‐ and the postcopulatory phases of sexual selection. We therefore manipulated the larval diet of male and female Drosophila melanogaster to study how body size variation in both sexes biases competitive outcomes at different reproductive stages, from mating to paternity. We did not find a difference in mate preference or mating latency between females of different conditions, nor any interaction between male and female conditions. However, large males were more successful in gaining matings, but only when in direct competition, whereas mating latencies were shorter for low‐condition males in noncompetitive settings. Small males also transferred more sperm to nonvirgin females, displaced a larger proportion of resident sperm, and achieved higher paternity shares per mating than large males. In agreement with existing theory, we suggest that small males might partially compensate for their low mating success by strategically investing in larger sperm numbers and potentially other, unmeasured ejaculate traits, when they do have a mating opportunity.

Abstract

Dietary restriction during development can affect adult body size and condition. In many species, larger (high‐condition) males gain higher mating success through male‐male competition and female choice, and female condition can affect the extent of both female mate choice and male investment in courtship or ejaculates. However, few studies have examined the joint effects and interplay of male and female condition during both the pre‐ and the postcopulatory phases of sexual selection. We therefore manipulated the larval diet of male and female Drosophila melanogaster to study how body size variation in both sexes biases competitive outcomes at different reproductive stages, from mating to paternity. We did not find a difference in mate preference or mating latency between females of different conditions, nor any interaction between male and female conditions. However, large males were more successful in gaining matings, but only when in direct competition, whereas mating latencies were shorter for low‐condition males in noncompetitive settings. Small males also transferred more sperm to nonvirgin females, displaced a larger proportion of resident sperm, and achieved higher paternity shares per mating than large males. In agreement with existing theory, we suggest that small males might partially compensate for their low mating success by strategically investing in larger sperm numbers and potentially other, unmeasured ejaculate traits, when they do have a mating opportunity.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
Life Sciences > Genetics
Life Sciences > General Agricultural and Biological Sciences
Uncontrolled Keywords:Genetics, Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics, General Agricultural and Biological Sciences
Language:English
Date:1 August 2021
Deposited On:18 May 2021 09:41
Last Modified:24 Feb 2024 02:50
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0014-3820
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/evo.14228
Official URL:https://academic.oup.com/evolut/article/75/8/2014/6730293
Project Information:
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant IDPP00P3_170669
  • : Project TitleGenetic variation in quality and sexual selection on condition-dependent traits