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Pre- and postnatal findings in trisomy 17 mosaicism


Abstract

Trisomy 17 mosaicism is one of the rarest autosomal trisomies in humans. Thus far, only 23 cases have been described, most of them detected prenatally. In only five instances has mosaicism been demonstrated in lymphocytes and/or fibroblasts postnatally, and only in these have multiple congenital anomalies (MCA), facial dysmorphisms, and mental retardation been reported. Patients with trisomy 17 mosaicism at amniocentesis and a normal karyotype in blood and fibroblasts (n = 17) were always healthy. Here, we report on pre- and postnatal clinical, cytogenetic, molecular-cytogenetic, and molecular findings in four patients with trisomy 17 mosaicism. The first case was detected in cultured but not in short-term chorionic villi and amniocytes. Due to MCA on prenatal ultrasound examination the pregnancy was terminated. The second patient is a 13-month-old healthy boy, in whom low level trisomy 17 mosaicism was detected in cultured chorionic villi only. The third patient is a 2-year-old girl with growth retardation, developmental delay, MCA, and trisomy 17 mosaicism in amniocytes, fibroblasts, and placenta, but not in blood and buccal smear. The fourth patient is a 9-year-old boy with growth and mental retardation, sensoneurinal hearing loss, and MCA. Cytogenetic analyses showed trisomy 17 mosaicism in amniocytes, skin fibroblasts, and urinary sediment cells, whereas in blood and buccal smear a 46,XY karyotype was found. Molecular investigations in all four cases indicated biparental inheritance of chromosome 17. Formation of trisomy was most likely due to a maternal meiosis I error in Patient 1 and a postzygotic non-disjunction of the paternal chromosome 17 in Patient 4. Cerebellar malformations, reported in two cases from the literature and in two reported here may be a specific feature of trisomy 17 mosaicism. Since the aberration has rarely been reported in lymphocytes, chordocentesis is not indicated in prenatal diagnosis. Prenatal genetic counseling for trisomy 17 mosaicism in chorionic villi or amniocytes should consider that the clinical significance remains uncertain.

Abstract

Trisomy 17 mosaicism is one of the rarest autosomal trisomies in humans. Thus far, only 23 cases have been described, most of them detected prenatally. In only five instances has mosaicism been demonstrated in lymphocytes and/or fibroblasts postnatally, and only in these have multiple congenital anomalies (MCA), facial dysmorphisms, and mental retardation been reported. Patients with trisomy 17 mosaicism at amniocentesis and a normal karyotype in blood and fibroblasts (n = 17) were always healthy. Here, we report on pre- and postnatal clinical, cytogenetic, molecular-cytogenetic, and molecular findings in four patients with trisomy 17 mosaicism. The first case was detected in cultured but not in short-term chorionic villi and amniocytes. Due to MCA on prenatal ultrasound examination the pregnancy was terminated. The second patient is a 13-month-old healthy boy, in whom low level trisomy 17 mosaicism was detected in cultured chorionic villi only. The third patient is a 2-year-old girl with growth retardation, developmental delay, MCA, and trisomy 17 mosaicism in amniocytes, fibroblasts, and placenta, but not in blood and buccal smear. The fourth patient is a 9-year-old boy with growth and mental retardation, sensoneurinal hearing loss, and MCA. Cytogenetic analyses showed trisomy 17 mosaicism in amniocytes, skin fibroblasts, and urinary sediment cells, whereas in blood and buccal smear a 46,XY karyotype was found. Molecular investigations in all four cases indicated biparental inheritance of chromosome 17. Formation of trisomy was most likely due to a maternal meiosis I error in Patient 1 and a postzygotic non-disjunction of the paternal chromosome 17 in Patient 4. Cerebellar malformations, reported in two cases from the literature and in two reported here may be a specific feature of trisomy 17 mosaicism. Since the aberration has rarely been reported in lymphocytes, chordocentesis is not indicated in prenatal diagnosis. Prenatal genetic counseling for trisomy 17 mosaicism in chorionic villi or amniocytes should consider that the clinical significance remains uncertain.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Medical Genetics
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Genetics
Health Sciences > Genetics (clinical)
Language:English
Date:1 August 2006
Deposited On:26 May 2021 14:33
Last Modified:25 Apr 2024 01:37
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1552-4825
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.31319
PubMed ID:16802327