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Shared Neurodevelopmental Perturbations Can Lead to Intellectual Disability in Individuals with Distinct Rare Chromosome Duplications


Corrêa, Thiago; Santos-Rebouças, Cíntia B; Mayndra, Maytza; Schinzel, Albert; Riegel, Mariluce; Riegel, Mariluce (2021). Shared Neurodevelopmental Perturbations Can Lead to Intellectual Disability in Individuals with Distinct Rare Chromosome Duplications. Genes, 12:632.

Abstract

Chromosomal duplications are associated with a large group of human diseases that arise mainly from dosage imbalance of genes within the rearrangements. Phenotypes range widely but are often associated with global development delay, intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorders, and multiple congenital abnormalities. How different contiguous genes from a duplicated genomic region interact and dynamically affect the expression of each other remains unclear in most cases. Here, we report a genomic comparative delineation of genes located in duplicated chromosomal regions 8q24.13q24.3, 18p11.32p11.21, and Xq22.3q27.2 in three patients followed up at our genetics service who has the intellectual disability (ID) as a common phenotype. We integrated several genomic data levels by identification of gene content within the duplications, protein-protein interactions, and functional analysis on specific tissues. We found functional relationships among genes from three different duplicated chromosomal regions, reflecting interactions of protein-coding genes and their involvement in common cellular subnetworks. Furthermore, the sharing of common significant biological processes associated with ID has been demonstrated between proteins from the different chromosomal regions. Finally, we elaborated a shared model of pathways directly or indirectly related to the central nervous system (CNS), which could perturb cognitive function and lead to ID in the three duplication conditions.

Abstract

Chromosomal duplications are associated with a large group of human diseases that arise mainly from dosage imbalance of genes within the rearrangements. Phenotypes range widely but are often associated with global development delay, intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorders, and multiple congenital abnormalities. How different contiguous genes from a duplicated genomic region interact and dynamically affect the expression of each other remains unclear in most cases. Here, we report a genomic comparative delineation of genes located in duplicated chromosomal regions 8q24.13q24.3, 18p11.32p11.21, and Xq22.3q27.2 in three patients followed up at our genetics service who has the intellectual disability (ID) as a common phenotype. We integrated several genomic data levels by identification of gene content within the duplications, protein-protein interactions, and functional analysis on specific tissues. We found functional relationships among genes from three different duplicated chromosomal regions, reflecting interactions of protein-coding genes and their involvement in common cellular subnetworks. Furthermore, the sharing of common significant biological processes associated with ID has been demonstrated between proteins from the different chromosomal regions. Finally, we elaborated a shared model of pathways directly or indirectly related to the central nervous system (CNS), which could perturb cognitive function and lead to ID in the three duplication conditions.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Medical Genetics
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Genetics
Health Sciences > Genetics (clinical)
Language:English
Date:23 April 2021
Deposited On:23 Jun 2021 16:22
Last Modified:25 Apr 2024 01:37
Publisher:MDPI Publishing
ISSN:2073-4425
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3390/genes12050632
PubMed ID:33922640
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)