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Hand hygiene compliance in companion animal clinics and practices in Switzerland: An observational study


Schmidt, Janne S; Hartnack, Sonja; Schuller, Simone; Kuster, Stefan P; Willi, Barbara (2021). Hand hygiene compliance in companion animal clinics and practices in Switzerland: An observational study. Veterinary Record, 189(1):Epub ahead of print-.

Abstract

Background: Hand hygiene (HH) is one of the most important measures to prevent healthcare-associated infections. Data on HH compliance in companion animal veterinary institutions in Europe are sparse.
Methods: This observational study assessed HH according to WHO standards in three large and two medium-sized clinics and two primary care practices in Switzerland. Associations with HH indication, professional group, clinical area and institution were determined using a generalized linear mixed effects model.
Results: Based on 2056 observations, overall HH compliance [95% confidence interval] was 32% [30%-34%]. HH compliance was highest in the consultation area (41% [38%-45%]) and after contact to body fluids (45% [40%-50%]), and lowest in the pre-OR area (20% [15%-24%]) and before clean/aseptic procedures (12% [9%-15%]). Veterinarians showed a higher HH compliance (37% [34%-40%]) than veterinary nurses (25% [22%-28%]). HH compliance was lower before clean/aseptic procedures compared to all other indications (all p < 0.015 except 'before touching a patient' in medium-sized clinics/practices, p = 0.095) and higher in the consultation area compared to all other areas in large clinics (all p < 0.04).
Conclusion: Effective HH training should urgently be promoted for all veterinary personnel with special emphasis on the importance of HH before clean/aseptic procedures.

Abstract

Background: Hand hygiene (HH) is one of the most important measures to prevent healthcare-associated infections. Data on HH compliance in companion animal veterinary institutions in Europe are sparse.
Methods: This observational study assessed HH according to WHO standards in three large and two medium-sized clinics and two primary care practices in Switzerland. Associations with HH indication, professional group, clinical area and institution were determined using a generalized linear mixed effects model.
Results: Based on 2056 observations, overall HH compliance [95% confidence interval] was 32% [30%-34%]. HH compliance was highest in the consultation area (41% [38%-45%]) and after contact to body fluids (45% [40%-50%]), and lowest in the pre-OR area (20% [15%-24%]) and before clean/aseptic procedures (12% [9%-15%]). Veterinarians showed a higher HH compliance (37% [34%-40%]) than veterinary nurses (25% [22%-28%]). HH compliance was lower before clean/aseptic procedures compared to all other indications (all p < 0.015 except 'before touching a patient' in medium-sized clinics/practices, p = 0.095) and higher in the consultation area compared to all other areas in large clinics (all p < 0.04).
Conclusion: Effective HH training should urgently be promoted for all veterinary personnel with special emphasis on the importance of HH before clean/aseptic procedures.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Chair in Veterinary Epidemiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > General Veterinary
Uncontrolled Keywords:General Veterinary, General Medicine
Language:English
Date:1 July 2021
Deposited On:06 Jul 2021 11:13
Last Modified:10 Jul 2021 01:09
Publisher:BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN:0042-4900
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/vetr.307

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