Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Social animal models for quantifying plasticity, assortment, and selection on interacting phenotypes


Martin, J S; Jaeggi, A V (2021). Social animal models for quantifying plasticity, assortment, and selection on interacting phenotypes. Journal of Evolutionary Biology:Epub ahead of print.

Abstract

Both assortment and plasticity can facilitate social evolution, as each may generate heritable associations between the phenotypes and fitness of individuals and their social partners. However, it currently remains difficult to empirically disentangle these distinct mechanisms in the wild, particularly for complex and environmentally responsive phenotypes subject to measurement error. To address this challenge, we extend the widely used animal model to facilitate unbiased estimation of plasticity, assortment, and selection on social traits, for both phenotypic and quantitative genetic analysis. Our social animal models (SAMs) estimate key evolutionary parameters for the latent reaction norms underlying repeatable patterns of phenotypic interaction across social environments. As a consequence of this approach, SAMs avoid inferential biases caused by various forms of measurement error in the raw phenotypic associations between social partners. We conducted a simulation study to demonstrate the application of SAMs and investigate their performance for both phenotypic and quantitative genetic analyses. With sufficient repeated measurements, we found desirably high power, low bias, and low uncertainty across model parameters using modest sample and effect sizes, leading to robust predictions of selection and adaptation. Our results suggest that SAMs will readily enhance social evolutionary research on a variety of phenotypes in the wild. We provide detailed coding tutorials and worked examples for implementing SAMs in the Stan statistical programming language.

Abstract

Both assortment and plasticity can facilitate social evolution, as each may generate heritable associations between the phenotypes and fitness of individuals and their social partners. However, it currently remains difficult to empirically disentangle these distinct mechanisms in the wild, particularly for complex and environmentally responsive phenotypes subject to measurement error. To address this challenge, we extend the widely used animal model to facilitate unbiased estimation of plasticity, assortment, and selection on social traits, for both phenotypic and quantitative genetic analysis. Our social animal models (SAMs) estimate key evolutionary parameters for the latent reaction norms underlying repeatable patterns of phenotypic interaction across social environments. As a consequence of this approach, SAMs avoid inferential biases caused by various forms of measurement error in the raw phenotypic associations between social partners. We conducted a simulation study to demonstrate the application of SAMs and investigate their performance for both phenotypic and quantitative genetic analyses. With sufficient repeated measurements, we found desirably high power, low bias, and low uncertainty across model parameters using modest sample and effect sizes, leading to robust predictions of selection and adaptation. Our results suggest that SAMs will readily enhance social evolutionary research on a variety of phenotypes in the wild. We provide detailed coding tutorials and worked examples for implementing SAMs in the Stan statistical programming language.

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Downloads

4 downloads since deposited on 11 Jul 2021
4 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Evolutionary Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
Language:English
Date:7 July 2021
Deposited On:11 Jul 2021 11:22
Last Modified:11 Jul 2021 11:22
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1010-061X
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/jeb.13900
PubMed ID:34233047

Download

Hybrid Open Access

Download PDF  'Social animal models for quantifying plasticity, assortment, and selection on interacting phenotypes'.
Preview
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 21MB
View at publisher
Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0)