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Experimental trauma rapidly modifies functional connectivity


Gvozdanovic, Geraldine; Seifritz, Erich; Stämpfli, Philipp; Canna, Antonietta; Rasch, Björn; Esposito, Fabrizio (2021). Experimental trauma rapidly modifies functional connectivity. Brain imaging and behavior, 15(4):2017-2030.

Abstract

Traumatic events can produce emotional, cognitive and autonomous physical responses. This may ultimately lead to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a psychiatric syndrome which requires comprehensive treatment. Trauma exposure alters functional connectivity; however, onset and nature of these changes are unknown. Here, we explore functional connectivity changes at rest directly after experimental trauma exposure. Seventy-three healthy subjects watched either a trauma or a control film. Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging measurements were conducted before and directly after the film. Seed-based analyses revealed trauma-related changes in functional connectivity, specifically including decreases of connectivity between amygdala and middle temporal gyrus and increases between hippocampus and precuneus. These central effects were accompanied by trauma-related increases in heart rate. Moreover, connectivity between the amygdala and middle temporal gyrus predicted subsequent trauma-related valence. Our results demonstrate rapid functional connectivity changes in memory-related brain regions at rest after experimental trauma, selectively relating to changes in emotions evoked by the trauma manipulation. Results could represent an early predictive biomarker for the development of trauma-related PTSD and thus provide an indication for the need of early targeted preventive interventions.

Abstract

Traumatic events can produce emotional, cognitive and autonomous physical responses. This may ultimately lead to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a psychiatric syndrome which requires comprehensive treatment. Trauma exposure alters functional connectivity; however, onset and nature of these changes are unknown. Here, we explore functional connectivity changes at rest directly after experimental trauma exposure. Seventy-three healthy subjects watched either a trauma or a control film. Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging measurements were conducted before and directly after the film. Seed-based analyses revealed trauma-related changes in functional connectivity, specifically including decreases of connectivity between amygdala and middle temporal gyrus and increases between hippocampus and precuneus. These central effects were accompanied by trauma-related increases in heart rate. Moreover, connectivity between the amygdala and middle temporal gyrus predicted subsequent trauma-related valence. Our results demonstrate rapid functional connectivity changes in memory-related brain regions at rest after experimental trauma, selectively relating to changes in emotions evoked by the trauma manipulation. Results could represent an early predictive biomarker for the development of trauma-related PTSD and thus provide an indication for the need of early targeted preventive interventions.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Business Administration
04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, and Psychosomatics
06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Zentrum für Interdisziplinäre Schlafforschung
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Imaging
Life Sciences > Neurology
Health Sciences > Neurology (clinical)
Life Sciences > Cognitive Neuroscience
Life Sciences > Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
Health Sciences > Psychiatry and Mental Health
Life Sciences > Behavioral Neuroscience
Scope:Discipline-based scholarship (basic research)
Language:English
Date:1 August 2021
Deposited On:18 Aug 2021 16:25
Last Modified:25 Apr 2024 01:38
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:1931-7557
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s11682-020-00396-2
PubMed ID:32989650
Other Identification Number:merlin-id:21413
Project Information:
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant ID100014_162388
  • : Project TitleOscillatory mechanisms underlying memory retention and reactivation during sleep
  • : FunderFK
  • : Grant ID16-074
  • : Project Title
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)