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Sleep-related and diurnal effects on brain diffusivity and cerebrospinal fluid flow


Tuura, Ruth O'Gorman; Volk, Carina; Callaghan, Fraser; Jaramillo, Valeria; Huber, Reto (2021). Sleep-related and diurnal effects on brain diffusivity and cerebrospinal fluid flow. NeuroImage, 241:118420.

Abstract

The question of how waste products are cleared from the brain, and the role which sleep plays in this process, is critical for our understanding of a range of physical and mental illnesses. In rodents, both circadian and sleep-related processes appear to facilitate clearance of waste products. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether overnight changes in diffusivity, brain volumes, and cerebrospinal fluid flow measured with MRI are associated with sleep parameters from overnight high-density sleep EEG, and circadian markers. In healthy adults investigated with MRI before and after sleep EEG, we observed an increase in water diffusivity overnight, which was positively related to the proportion of total sleep time spent in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, and negatively associated with the fraction of sleep time spent in non rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Diffusivity was also associated with the sleep midpoint, a circadian marker. CSF flow increased overnight; this increase was unrelated to sleep or diffusivity measures but was associated with circadian markers. These results provide evidence for both sleep related and diurnal effects on water compartmentalisation within the brain.

Abstract

The question of how waste products are cleared from the brain, and the role which sleep plays in this process, is critical for our understanding of a range of physical and mental illnesses. In rodents, both circadian and sleep-related processes appear to facilitate clearance of waste products. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether overnight changes in diffusivity, brain volumes, and cerebrospinal fluid flow measured with MRI are associated with sleep parameters from overnight high-density sleep EEG, and circadian markers. In healthy adults investigated with MRI before and after sleep EEG, we observed an increase in water diffusivity overnight, which was positively related to the proportion of total sleep time spent in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, and negatively associated with the fraction of sleep time spent in non rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Diffusivity was also associated with the sleep midpoint, a circadian marker. CSF flow increased overnight; this increase was unrelated to sleep or diffusivity measures but was associated with circadian markers. These results provide evidence for both sleep related and diurnal effects on water compartmentalisation within the brain.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Neurology
Life Sciences > Cognitive Neuroscience
Language:English
Date:21 July 2021
Deposited On:13 Oct 2021 14:28
Last Modified:14 Oct 2021 20:00
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1053-8119
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2021.118420
PubMed ID:34302966

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