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The PRISMA imaging spectroscopy mission: overview and first performance analysis


Cogliati, Sergio; Sarti, F; Chiarantini, L; Cosi, M; Lorusso, R; Lopinto, E; Miglietta, F; Genesio, L; Guanter, Luis; Damm, Alexander; Pérez-López, S; Scheffler, D; Tagliabue, G; Panigada, C; Rascher, Uwe; Dowling, T P F; Giardino, C; Colombo, R (2021). The PRISMA imaging spectroscopy mission: overview and first performance analysis. Remote Sensing of Environment, 262:112499.

Abstract

The PRISMA satellite mission launched on March 22nd, 2019 is one of the latest spaceborne imaging spectroscopy
mission for Earth Observation. The PRISMA satellite comprises a high-spectral resolution VNIR-SWIR imaging
spectrometer and a panchromatic camera. In summer 2019, first operations during the commissioning phase were mainly devoted to acquisitions in specific areas for evaluating instrument functioning, in-flight performance, and mission data product accuracy. A field and airborne campaign was carried out over an agriculture area in Italy to collect in-situ multi-source spectroscopy measurements at different scales simultaneously with PRISMA. The spectral, radiometric and spatial performance of PRISMA Level 1 Top-Of-Atmosphere radiance (LTOA) product were analyzed. The in-situ surface reflectance measurements over different landcovers were propagated to LTOA using MODTRAN5 radiative transfer simulations and compared with satellite observations. Overall, this work offers a first quantitative evaluation about the PRISMA mission performance and imaging spectroscopy LTOA data product consistency. Our results show that the spectral smile is less than 5 nm, the average spectral resolution is 13 nm and 11 nm (VNIR and SWIR respectively) and it varies ±2 nm across track. The radiometric comparison between PRISMA and field/airborne spectroscopy shows a difference lower than 5% for NIR and SWIR, whereas it is included in the 2–7% range in the VIS. The estimated instrument signal to noise ratio (SNR) is ≈400–500 in the NIR and part of the SWIR (<1300 nm), lower SNR values were found at shorter (<700 nm) and longer wavelengths (>1600 nm). The VNIR-to-SWIR spatial co-registration error is below 8 m and the spatial resolution is 37.11 m and 38.38 m for VNIR and SWIR respectively. The results are in-line with the expectations and mission requirements and indicate that acquired images are suitable for further scientific applications. However, this first assessment is based on data from a rural area and this cannot be fully exhaustive. Further studies are needed to confirm the performance for other land cover types like snow, inland and coastal waters, deserts or urban areas.

Abstract

The PRISMA satellite mission launched on March 22nd, 2019 is one of the latest spaceborne imaging spectroscopy
mission for Earth Observation. The PRISMA satellite comprises a high-spectral resolution VNIR-SWIR imaging
spectrometer and a panchromatic camera. In summer 2019, first operations during the commissioning phase were mainly devoted to acquisitions in specific areas for evaluating instrument functioning, in-flight performance, and mission data product accuracy. A field and airborne campaign was carried out over an agriculture area in Italy to collect in-situ multi-source spectroscopy measurements at different scales simultaneously with PRISMA. The spectral, radiometric and spatial performance of PRISMA Level 1 Top-Of-Atmosphere radiance (LTOA) product were analyzed. The in-situ surface reflectance measurements over different landcovers were propagated to LTOA using MODTRAN5 radiative transfer simulations and compared with satellite observations. Overall, this work offers a first quantitative evaluation about the PRISMA mission performance and imaging spectroscopy LTOA data product consistency. Our results show that the spectral smile is less than 5 nm, the average spectral resolution is 13 nm and 11 nm (VNIR and SWIR respectively) and it varies ±2 nm across track. The radiometric comparison between PRISMA and field/airborne spectroscopy shows a difference lower than 5% for NIR and SWIR, whereas it is included in the 2–7% range in the VIS. The estimated instrument signal to noise ratio (SNR) is ≈400–500 in the NIR and part of the SWIR (<1300 nm), lower SNR values were found at shorter (<700 nm) and longer wavelengths (>1600 nm). The VNIR-to-SWIR spatial co-registration error is below 8 m and the spatial resolution is 37.11 m and 38.38 m for VNIR and SWIR respectively. The results are in-line with the expectations and mission requirements and indicate that acquired images are suitable for further scientific applications. However, this first assessment is based on data from a rural area and this cannot be fully exhaustive. Further studies are needed to confirm the performance for other land cover types like snow, inland and coastal waters, deserts or urban areas.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Soil Science
Physical Sciences > Geology
Physical Sciences > Computers in Earth Sciences
Uncontrolled Keywords:Computers in Earth Sciences, Geology, Soil Science
Language:English
Date:1 September 2021
Deposited On:02 Sep 2021 12:30
Last Modified:03 Sep 2021 20:00
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0034-4257
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rse.2021.112499
Project Information:
  • : FunderEuropean Space Agency
  • : Grant ID
  • : Project Title
  • : FunderItalian Space Agency
  • : Grant ID
  • : Project Title

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