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Commensal Clostridiales strains mediate effective anti-cancer immune response against solid tumors


Abstract

Despite overall success, T cell checkpoint inhibitors for cancer treatment are still only efficient in a minority of patients. Recently, intestinal microbiota was found to critically modulate anti-cancer immunity and therapy response. Here, we identify Clostridiales members of the gut microbiota associated with a lower tumor burden in mouse models of colorectal cancer (CRC). Interestingly, these commensal species are also significantly reduced in CRC patients compared with healthy controls. Oral application of a mix of four Clostridiales strains (CC4) in mice prevented and even successfully treated CRC as stand-alone therapy. This effect depended on intratumoral infiltration and activation of CD8$^{+}$ T cells. Single application of Roseburia intestinalis or Anaerostipes caccae was even more effective than CC4. In a direct comparison, the CC4 mix supplementation outperformed anti-PD-1 therapy in mouse models of CRC and melanoma. Our findings provide a strong preclinical foundation for exploring gut bacteria as novel stand-alone therapy against solid tumors.

Abstract

Despite overall success, T cell checkpoint inhibitors for cancer treatment are still only efficient in a minority of patients. Recently, intestinal microbiota was found to critically modulate anti-cancer immunity and therapy response. Here, we identify Clostridiales members of the gut microbiota associated with a lower tumor burden in mouse models of colorectal cancer (CRC). Interestingly, these commensal species are also significantly reduced in CRC patients compared with healthy controls. Oral application of a mix of four Clostridiales strains (CC4) in mice prevented and even successfully treated CRC as stand-alone therapy. This effect depended on intratumoral infiltration and activation of CD8$^{+}$ T cells. Single application of Roseburia intestinalis or Anaerostipes caccae was even more effective than CC4. In a direct comparison, the CC4 mix supplementation outperformed anti-PD-1 therapy in mouse models of CRC and melanoma. Our findings provide a strong preclinical foundation for exploring gut bacteria as novel stand-alone therapy against solid tumors.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Oncology and Hematology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Molecular Cancer Research
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Molecular Cancer Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 October 2021
Deposited On:27 Sep 2021 06:54
Last Modified:15 Oct 2021 01:08
Publisher:Cell Press (Elsevier)
ISSN:1931-3128
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chom.2021.08.001
PubMed ID:34453895

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